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Review: The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

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I have a confession to make. I devour a good love story. However, I’m not talking about a love story the way you think I am. Sure The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society ends in a love story and that makes you think the whole point of the movie was for Juliet to fall in love, but that isn’t it at all. This is a love story of an island, of a community, of family and books. This is the type of feel good movie that you want to share with people and I’m here to share it with you. 

Juliet is played by Lily James, who I am a big fan of, and she does a fantastic job portraying a young writer trying to find herself after World War 2. She’s lost parts of herself and is trying to live a life she thought she should. Find the handsome husband, write stories about love and women, and live a comfortable life. Then she receives a letter from Dawsey, played by Michiel Huisman, that throws everything out of whack. She decides to visit him and his society. In fact, she just doesn’t seem to be able to keep herself from leaving as quick as possible.  

This leads to a plot full of intrigue, books, and a family made on the island. She meets remarkable people on Guernsey. Some turn out to become family, others show how war can make someone hard and unreasonable. She chooses to see the bright side of things and do everything she can to help these new friends. I really don’t like giving away everything in a review because I want you to experience it for yourself, so let’s just say that, through flashbacks of the war, she learns a lot about these people and how they came to be who they are.  

Through this learning of how the war affected this island and its inhabitants, she starts to see how she wants her life to be. She realizes what is important in life and what she was just doing because she didn’t know what else to do. In the end, it is the love of books and the love of people that brings them all together and helps her to figure out what she ultimately wants out of her life. I like period pieces and I find this one to be very good. I would recommend it to anyone that loves a good story. That has a notion to read a different sort of love story and to want to share it with someone they love afterwards.  

Real Women of Gaming’s Top Things We’re Thankful For

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Thanksgiving was days ago, yes, but the spirit of being thankful is still upon us. In this spirit, the Real Women of Gaming Staff has shared what they are thankful for this holiday season. Let us know in the comments below what you’re thankful for!

I am so thankful for the friends that I’ve made while embracing and celebrating all the things that I love and nerd out about. I’m finally living in a time where I can openly talk about my love for Dungeons & Dragons, gaming, fandoms (ALL THE FANDOMS). This has helped me to make some deep connections with friends that I was previously unable to make while hiding so much of myself. I am blessed that I have them all and all of the RWoG staff are true and dear friends to me. I love them all to bits. ~Crymson Pleasure~

I should start off by saying that I am grateful for many things, however one thing that has consistently made my world better is fandom. Some of my best friends have been made by “geeking out.” I joined this wonderful group because of a conversation that started with fandom. I truly am not sure if I would be alive if not for the friends that I have made because of fandoms. Fandom have been my shield, my safe space, a place to hone my talents, my mirror and my fun!

Always keep sparkling -Thia the Bard

I am thankful for my parents. Whatever my Dad could do for us, he did. He worked two jobs, moonlighting as a drummer in a wedding band while fixing vending machines during the day. My Mom, aside from the massive task of raising 3 boys and a girl, taught us how to play. Every board game we got we learned through her. All the classic parlor games, she taught us. When we got our first console…she kicked us off of it so she could play. She’s the reason I create, the reason I play games. I’m thankful for Mom and Dad. -MaxUrso

Over the past several weeks, I’ve been working overtime to keep my guild running smoothly, ensure its stability, and maintain its growth. It’s left me stressed-out, exhausted, and unhappy. My in-game friends know me well enough to notice, and care enough about my wellbeing to intervene. In this ‘intervention,’ they insisted I take a break from raiding and offered to take over some of my duties as a guild officer. It’s given me the chance to recharge and catch up on some RL duties I’d been neglecting. I couldn’t be more grateful. I am so, so thankful that these people, people whose faces I’ve never seen with my own eyes, are looking out for me. -Solyria

I’m thankful for many things, including my husband, my friends, my family, and my health. More specifically, I’m thankful for my new, full-time job and the geeky friends I’m making there. It’s awesome to be working in an environment where coworkers tell me that I “rolled a 20” or got a “critical hit” on a piece of work, where people play D&D over lunch, and where we’ve set up biweekly board game nights after work. It certainly makes the daily grind that much more bearable, and sometimes even enjoyable. -Rinshi

Things I am thankful for…A steady D&D play group of fun friends to play with that make me laugh and enjoy the game. Being able to go out on Friday night and play Magic: the Gathering for a few hours with other friends and get stomped and do some stomping. Waiting on the news on when I will get my new Kitty Mango  -Fluffy the Necromancer

This year’s been a tough one. I’m thankful for the friends and family that were with me, and are still with me. The health of my family, and my son getting his GED. My job still being great, and my writing starting to get some notice out in the world. -Trever

I’m thankful for conventions. A lot of the time I feel like my world is very small. It’s easy to me to retreat to the familiar and I end up feeling like it’s impossible for me to meet new people and make new friends. Conventions get me out among awesome people who share my love of awesome things and I have made some great new friends going to them. -UC Booties

I am thankful for a roof over my head. It has been a rough year I think for everyone but personally it had gotten to a point where things were getting to the unknown. I am very thankful for my amazing husband who supports me in this endeavor of being a part of this group and my streaming career. I couldn’t do it without him. -KinkedNitemare-

I am thankful for video games, which make me happy even if some of them are as old as I am. Video games have evolved with technology and there is something to fit every person now. They help teach children, they help people focus. They provide escape from tough times, even if only for a little bit. VR is now helping people approach situations that are scary to help them get over their fears as much as it is entertaining.

Hearing the do-do-do-do of the dungeon song in Mario makes me smile, every time. Seeing the old games from Atari and SNES brings me back to a childhood where video games were primitive but oh so thrilling. My family used to gather around to play… or watch my dad play Dig Dug for the millionth time. Even now, my family gathers to play. Separately, hubby has his World of Tanks. My 62 year old Mom, has her World of Warcraft, played religiously. My brother, the traitor with the PS4. The XBox One is all mine. But together, we have Mario Kart. We have board games like Monopoly made into video games (no banker cheating, yay!), among others.

So I am thankful for video games, without which my life would have gone on, but would have been a great deal more boring for it. -Chritter

There ya have it, folks! What are you thankful for?

Parenting in a Gaming and Technological World

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Before we jump down this rabbit hole I’d like you to say a word in your head.  It’s a simple word, but not always an easy one, especially when it comes to our kids.  Just say it with me, “No.”

When I grew up, my parents weren’t gamers, though they did play some video games with us kids.  They found a few games they liked, but overall it wasn’t their primary hobby.  I’ve been a parent for almost eighteen years now, and have been a gamer much longer.  My son’s been a gamer since he was old enough to hold a controller.  Despite the difference between my hobbies, and my parents’, there’s one commonality, we parent.  There are different challenges I’m sure, but I’ve always been a gamer so I can only imagine what it was like for my folks, before the internet, before PC gaming, and before cable was really a household staple.  Now we have a plethora of digital media that kids can access literally at their fingertips, but despite it all we still parent.  Say it with me, “No.”

I’m reminded of a conversation I had on Twitter, with an anti-porn advocate that thinks porn should be banned…on the internet…good luck, buddy.  Anyway, this guy was going on about how kids can access porn all the time; smart phones, tablets, laptops, just porn all the time.  But I mentioned that parents have a responsibility to make sure their children understand what’s acceptable, to explain sex and porn, and to monitor their habits.  To this guy, that wasn’t enough, but why not?  Are parents powerless to monitor their child’s online habits?  Of course now you’re saying, “Hey, the title says Gaming!”.  Yes, I’m getting there, but honestly to me the challenges here are the same, as are the responsibilities.  You know the word you should be saying, say it again, “No.”

Children cannot get a cell phone, computer, laptop, tablet, or gaming console without a parent to give them money, sign contracts, and give permission.  Of course once they have these, getting access to websites, games, chat rooms, and social media is easier, but we parents still have tools like parental controls, and our own eyes.  We have to take a bit of responsibility upon ourselves to look at ratings, chat logs, browser history, and take the time to be involved.  Talk to our kids about what’s going on, see what they’re doing from time to time, and even when they get upset that we’re ‘invading their privacy’ we have to remind them that as parents, that’s our job.  It sucks sometimes, but it’s what we do.  Say it again, Sam. “No.”

As an example, my son didn’t get a cell phone until just recently and he’ll be eighteen this year.  I didn’t need one as a kid, he didn’t need one either.  As soon as he got old enough to be going places on his own, and soon start looking for work, then we got him one.  The same sort of responsibility goes into monitoring gaming habits.  He doesn’t buy a game without asking, and he didn’t get Grand Theft Auto, no matter how many times he asked, until I thought he was old enough to play it.  I said, “No.”

That’s the hardest part for gamers, I think.  We love games, and we love when our kids love games.  Sometimes we have to be conscious of when games are acceptable for us, but not for our kids.  We look at other gamers and rarely consider things like age, we are all just gamers, but when they’re our kids we have to consider that.  I didn’t have that trouble with GTA – I don’t own it, never will, it’s just not my thing – but I can understand wanting to share a game we love with our kids.  We want to play online with them, and share our interests, so it’s easy to overlook things like ratings.  We have to be able to say it, “No.”

A lot of parents lament at the options available to kids, but we have to be the gatekeepers for all of that content.  I imagine it’s more difficult than it was for our parents, but we don’t really know any different, we weren’t parents then.  It’s the world we live in, and we have to try to balance our own love for gaming, and the culture around it, with raising our kids in that world.  Help them understand the difference between the online world and the real one.  Teach them how to interact with people face to face, as well as the value of dealing with people online like they’re other people.  Explain how there are ugly places in the world, dark ideas, uncomfortable themes in games, all that exist for a reason and why they are ugly, dark, and uncomfortable.  Most of all we need to say…you guessed it, “No.”

It doesn’t have to be all negative though.  There are tons of games out there to play with your kids, and ways to parent through gaming.  Learning games, puzzle games, adventure games that you can co-op with them.  Spend time with them and share your love of the hobby.  Incorporate family time into fun party games, racing games and sports games.  It’s a great way to have time with your family and share something we all love.  This is the greatest part of being a parent in a gaming world, but we always have a responsibility, and we have to be able to say, “No.”