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Top 10 Female Magic: The Gathering Players


So, I was asked to come up with a list of Top 10 Female Magic: the Gathering players. It seems that some people are still living with the (stupid) idea that women can’t play M:tG for whatever reasons they can come up with. While it has admittedly been a long time since a woman won a major tournament (Eda Bilsel of Turkey in 2003 became M:tG’s first National Champion), there are quite a few that place within the top 8 of Grand Prix’s, and the Star City Open series. Go to any Pro Tour Qualifier (PPTQ), Grand Prix, or other tournament around the world and you will find women and girls of all ages competing.

The current youngest player at Grand Prix to ever qualify for day 2 is 12-years-old and held by a boy; however, this is being threatened by 6-year-old Dana Fisher who, at her last GP, missed qualifying by 1 win. A 6-year-old girl is out playing most of the men 2 or 3 times her age, and is getting better each time she competes. If she can keep up the trend, then in just a few years she will be making top 8’s and pushing for the big win.  So, in no particular order here, is my list of 10 Female M:tG players to watch for or just to watch as some are also streamers.

1. Dana Fisher

2. Emma Handy

3. Gaby Spartz

4. Jennifer Long

5. Melissa DeTora

6. Magic The Amateuring (Also have a Podcast)

7. Feline Longmore

8. Athena Huey

9. Jackie Lee*

10. Tifa Robles**

I have been playing Magic: The Gathering since 1994 and can say I have lost more than my fair share of matches to women who played better than me. I expect it to happen again in the future as I keep going to tournaments. I look forward to it as Magic: The Gathering is something that everyone can and should enjoy to play.

*Melissa DeTora and Jackie Lee both now work for Wizards of the Coast. Jackie helped design some of the current sets, and Melissa is part of a new playtest team.

**Tifa Robles founded the Lady Planeswalkers to help get more women interested in playing Magic: The Gathering


Summer Reading List: Books Based on Games and Games Based on Books

Whether it’s for listening to on Audible while working out or as we’re starting to plan that poolside novel list, most of us are always on the lookout for great book recommendations. Did you know there are more book/game tie-ins than just Lord of the Rings and Rainbow Six? Consider incorporating some of your favorite games into your spring and summer reading with our favorite books that inspired great games, or were inspired by them:


The Witcher

The Witcher is based on a collection of short stories by Andrezej Sapkowski. The success of The Saga, the full-length novels following the short stories, prompted its video game adaptation. The games take place about thirty years after the Saga. There are several books in total including a prequel, and the newest, Season of Storms, comes out in May.


The S.T.A.L.K.E.R. games are based on a 1970s novel called Roadside Picnic. In the novel, the Zones are restricted areas visited and then abandoned by aliens. The book follows the  an experienced stalker who ventures into the Zone to find valuable artifacts. The novels pre-dated Chernobyl, but the site made a terrific setting for the dark and moody video game adaptation.


WDragon Age

Dragon Age
The first Dragon Age novel served as a prequel to Dragon Age: Origins in 2009. Since then there have been five novels based on the series, set in a among the games. These are consistently ranked well by Dragon Age players on Goodreads, and provide a lot of depth insofar as the history of Thedas before and during the games. The first three novels are written by David Gaider, Dragon Age‘s lead writer.


Gears of War
Written by award winning author Karen Traviss, this series really fleshes out the Gears of War story. Originally expected to be a trilogy, the five GoW novels weave in and out of the games, offering perspective of the events you’ve played as well as those you’ve only heard mentioned. Additionally, there are many backstories are here as well, fleshing out several familiar characters.


Would it surprise you to learn that there are more Halo books than there are games? There are currently twenty five novels set in the Halo-verse, with a new one, Halo: Bad Blood, set for release this year. Originally this extended universe was not overseen by Bungie publishing, which created a few canonical issues that were changed between the books and games. Since the advent of 343 Industries, the writing process the book and games stories have become much more consistent and intertwined.


Metro 2033
Metro 2033 is based on a 2005 novel of the same name by Dmitry Glukhovsky. As in the game, the book takes place in the subway system Moscow after it is devastated by nuclear holocaust and the main player-character is the same as the book’s protagonist. Glukhovsky himself worked on the adaptation.


Uncharted: the Fourth Labyrinth is a great addition to a series rich in myth and story. This book follows Nate and Sully on a fortune hunting adventure in between the 2nd and 3rd games.  Written by best selling author Christopher Golden, its a must-read for fans of the Uncharted franchise.

Got another suggestion for a great, game based read? Add it in the comments!

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Influental Women in the Gaming Industry: Yoko Shimomura

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The gaming industry would not be the same without Yoko Shimomura. She is a talented composer and musician. Yoko has used these talents to bring some of our favorite video games to life.

Yoko was born in Japan in 1967. She started playing the piano at a young age and found that she really enjoyed it. Yoko then graduated from Osaka College of Music in 1988.  After graduating Yoko knew that she had options on how she could share her talents with the rest of the world. She knew that her music had the power to make the world a better place.


She decided to pursue a career in a field where she would become one of the most famous video game composers in the world. Yoko started her journey by working for Capcom. From 1993 to 2002 Yoko worked for Square Enix. From 2003 on Yoko has been working as a freelance composer.

Yoko has given life and beauty to many different video games throughout the years. She has worked on the Mario & Luigi: Paper Jam soundtrack to give it a lighter and more upbeat feel. Gamers can listen to Yoko’s stylings as they restore the land in the Legend of Mana soundtrack. Anther popular RPG is the Kingdom Hearts games which Yoko also lent her talents to. Final Fantasy XY has also benefited from Yoko’s talents as a composer.

Yoko Shimomura has given the world of gamers much beauty. She shows that all kinds of talents are needed to make the gaming industry great. She has taken risks to bring her music to the world and they have, thankfully, paid off. Yoko is an example of how hard work and creativity makes the world a richer place to live. Sometimes your talent can even make multiple worlds richer.

Always keep sparkling.

Review: Luigi’s Mansion

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I’ve heard that gamers consider Luigi’s Mansion to be a classic from the Nintendo GameCube era. Personally, I’d given it a try once before and didn’t get very far before I lost interest. But that was years ago, so why not try again?

Well, I tried, and I did end up enjoying it. It’s just not a game that I’d want to play over and over again.

Here’s the premise: Luigi, the lovable brother of the famous Super Mario, has just won a mansion. That sounds great, except that Luigi doesn’t recall entering a contest in the first place. When he arrives, he discovers that it’s filled with ghosts and that Mario’s trapped somewhere inside! Luckily, there’s a quirky old ghost hunter named Professor E. Gadd (I love that name) who equips our hero with a Poltergust 3000 that will suck up any attacking ghosts.

As he clears each room of ghosts with his new vacuum-weapon, it’s up to Luigi to figure out what happened to Mario and who’s responsible for trapping them in the mansion.

First, I love the music that plays throughout Luigi’s Mansion. It’s spooky and playful, so it fits the game well. It’s cute how Luigi will hum or whistle along as he walks through each room. He’s a great character; while he doesn’t speak much, he’s very expressive. Plus, you have to admire him for fighting off ghosts single-handedly, even when he’s clearly scared out of his mind, because he loves his brother that much.

In theory, the gameplay is simple: Luigi uses his magic vacuum to suck up ghosts. As he goes through the house, he’ll also uncover elements medals that let him use fire, water, and ice on the environment and special ghosts.

That’s all fine and good, except this means that Luigi’s Mansion centers on aiming in the right direction with the Poltergust and I cannot aim to save my life. It’s one of the reasons why I usually don’t play shooters, and why my weapon of choice in Bioshock was the wrench. Every time an arrow challenge comes up in a Zelda dungeon, I waste countless arrows trying to hit the target while groaning in agony. So that made Luigi’s Mansion more frustrating for me than fun. But if that’s something you’re good at, you’ll have no problem conquering Luigi’s Mansion.

Still, the longer I played, the more I found myself enjoying the game. It’s fun to search the house for ghosts. Some are Boos, some look like blobs with faces, and then there’s a special type: the Portrait Ghosts. Professor E. Gadd once had them trapped in paintings, until they escaped right before the start of the game. They each have a unique design and personality, though most of them aren’t hard to capture compared to regular ghosts.

It’s also worth mentioning that Luigi’s Mansion is a short game that you can complete within a couple of days, depending on how much time you spend on it. It only has four “areas” to unlock, plus the room of the final boss. Since I wasn’t extremely invested in the game, I didn’t mind its length. Others may find that aspect disappointing.

If you have a GameCube and you love Luigi, Luigi’s Mansion is a game worth playing. It’s not my favorite video game, but I don’t regret trying it out.

Games to Get Excited About: April 2018


April is a short month for video game releases, but there are a couple of good titles in the mix, and a couple that I think people are going to be pretty excited about.  We also have some of the Nintendo Labo kits coming out, which aren’t games, but I’m sure there are some young gamers out there looking forward to these.

When the original Pillars of Eternity released, it was a great day for fans of classic RPGs like Baldur’s Gate and Icewind Dale.  Those games are remembered fondly for their style, scope, and scale.  They set the foundation for the RPGs we have today.  Newer RPGs may be prettier, and have more bells and whistles, but people still consider those old school games to be the best.  Pillars of Eternity was a true callback to those games that created so much of what’s used in RPGs today.

Why I’m Excited

I haven’t played the original game yet, there’s just too many games and not enough time.  It is on my list to get around to and I’m glad to know that this type of RPG is still viable in the market.  These are the types of games I devoured in the mid 90s and I still love them.  This release just means I have more to look forward to when my schedule and budget allow.

I’m also excited because the developer, Obsidian, is basically made up of the people who gave us those classic RPGs we love.  They came from Interplay, which was part of Black Isle.  They helped bring us Baldur’s Gate, Icewind Dale, Neverwinter Nights, Knight of the Old Republic II and quite a few other great RPGs.  They know their stuff, so it’s no wonder the original Pillars turned out to be so well received.  They have also chosen the crowd funding path with this one, which will allow them the creative freedom to deliver the game they want.

Pillars of Eternity II is set to release for PC on the 3rd, and consoles later in the year.  The developer notes that they are addressing some criticism of the first game and making some changes that should make fans happy.  This will be set in a new part of the game’s world so that players will see new landscapes and people.  They also say that the player’s actions in the first game will have an impact on this one, so that makes me think there will be some sort of saved game transfer like we saw with those older games.

In the story for Deadfire, the player will chase down Eothas, the God that you faced down in the first one.  Eothas escaped and the player travels to Deadfire Archipelago to find out what’s going on.  It will feature the usual conversation complexity and companion interaction we’ve come to expect.  This one, however, also adds a seafaring element.  A customizable ship/base from which to launch your adventure and use as a headquarters.  Sounds like a lot of fun.

Other Notable Releases for April

Extinction – Coming early in the month is a game from Iron Galaxy that will pit players, as a human warrior defending humanity from an invasion of 150ft tall monsters called “Ogres”.

Yakuza 6: The Song of Life – The next installment of this action adventure series drops on the 17th for PS4.  The release will include other games in the package like Virtual Fighter 5 and Puyo Puyo.

God of War – Unofficially God of War 4; this game will take our hero to the frigid north to fight monsters of Norse legend along with his son Atreus.  It will hit PS4 on the 20th.

The Legend of Heroes: Trails of Cold Steel II – The second installment of this JRPG title comes out at the end of the month on PS4.  It was released for PC back in February.

Starting Players on the “Right” Foot: A Dungeon Master’s Guide.


Over a decade ago, there was a defining moment that would shape my Dungeon Mastering career. The moment that nearly all tabletop gamers share has long been burned into my psyche. A reminder. Thinking about it now: my hands clench into a fist, my heart skips a beat, my brow furrows. I feel a swelling of inner rage waiting to barf forward through my fingertips as I type. This moment, that still fills me with anguish and regret nearly 15 years later, could easily have turned me off from the hobby forever. It was the dreaded horrible first game!

No seriously… That’s it. A bad game.

The whole thing lasted around an hour before the Dungeon Master laughed maniacally as my Elven Wizard lied burnt to death on the ground being eaten by ravenous goblins. I was given no choice, no interaction, nothing. He made all the rolls. He decided what I would do. I had no idea what was going on. Nothing was explained. I felt lost…

Why is this moment so important? You may say to yourself: “Hey me, you’re awesome. You’ve been in bad games before and they didn’t leave a lasting effect. What gives?” This part, it isn’t about you. It’s about the countless number of people that will never return to our hobby because of the experience they had. Whether it be with the mouth breathing creeper, the surly rules lawyer, or the “DM vs. The Player” mentality, something turned them off.

We won’t see that person again. 

Read the rest of this entry

Bitcoin Mining: How it Affects PC Gamers


If you’re like me, you hear the word “Bitcoin” and automatically think “huh?” As far as I was concerned, bitcoin was an online cryptocurrency that had nothing to do with anything I was interested in. A friend of mine told me a few years ago to invest in it, but that’s not really my strong suit, so I ignored him and kept on gaming.

Well, I should have paid more attention. Bitcoin has blown up. Bitcoin is apparently worth thousands. It’s currently an unregulated currency that allows people to make online purchases anonymously. It’s not tied to any banks or any government; it’s completely online.

There are various ways to get bitcoin. First, you can use an exchange app, such as Coinbase. Second, a friend or possibly an employer or buyer can transfer bitcoin to you online, much like sending cash digitally (think Paypal or Venmo). Finally, and most importantly to the topic of this article, you can mine it.

According to CNNTech, people use computers to solve complex math problems in a competition. A winner is chosen every 10 minutes and awarded with 12.5 bitcoins. This is how new bitcoin is created.

Bitcoin miners are buying high end GPUs in bulk in order to solve these math problems faster, thus creating a significant shortage in the supply. This shortage is driving up the prices at a nearly 80% markup.


Because of this drastic increase in price and shortage of supply, PC gamers are finding it almost impossible to build their own rigs. Nvidia has strongly suggested that retailers prioritize gamers over miners, but retailers are going to sell to whomever is going to pay. Some retailers have tried to place a limit on how many any one person can buy at one time, while others, like Micro Center in Pennsylvania, are offering huge discounts to gamers who buy their GPUs with other computer parts.

This problem doesn’t look like it’s going away anytime soon, which will drastically impact PC gamers in the long run. Why spend upwards of $800 for a $300 GPU when you can just buy a PS4 or Xbox One X for $500? How long until the price of pre-built computers goes up, too?

Until suppliers can meet the demand and flood the market with graphics cards, gamers are going to see the shit end of the stick.

Tell us your thoughts in the comments below!