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Review: Theatrhythm Final Fantasy: Curtain Call

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Written by Iris the Keyblade Master

The Theatrhythm Final Fantasy games celebrate one of the best aspects of the series: the music.  Both rhythm games are available for the Nintendo 3DS.  Although if you’re interested in giving Theatrhythm a try, don’t waste your money purchasing both of them.  The sequel, Curtain Call, has all of the same songs and lots more.

I debated with myself about whether to get the original Theatrhythm when it was first released on the Nintendo 3DS.   Having gotten booed out of levels of Guitar Hero and Dance Dance Revolution, and surviving the infamous Little Mermaid sidequest in Kingdom Hearts 2…my experiences with rhythm games weren’t very good ones.  But someone at GameStop encouraged me to give it a try, and that’s how I ended up losing countless hours of my life to this game.  I have no regrets.

The gameplay’s divided into three types of stages: Field, Battle, and Event.  Field songs consist of tracks like “Terra’s Theme” from Final Fantasy VI, the main theme from VII, and “A Place to Call Home” from IX.  An adorable chibi Final Fantasy character of your choosing strolls along a path to the music, while you try to hit as many notes correctly as possible.  Although the notes can come across the screen quickly, depending on the song and the difficulty level, Field Stages are generally slower in pace than their Battle counterparts.

In Battle, you create a party of four chibi characters who fight different monsters and villains who have appeared throughout the Final Fantasy series.  When you hit the right notes, their attacks are successful.  If you miss a note, they lose health.  (This actually applies to the Field and Event stages too, except you’re not attacking anything. You’re just trying to keep the character’s health bar full.)  The songs you can choose from include the always classic “One-Winged Angel,” as well as “Dancing Mad,” “The Man With the Machine Gun,” and “Battle on the Big Bridge.”

Last, but not least, we have the Event stages.  These stages were more prevalent in the original game, because every entry from the series had one.  In Curtain Call, all of the songs that originally appeared as Event stages got turned into Field or Battle stages instead.  It’s a shame, because even if they’re difficult to play, they’re beautiful to watch.  Instead of battling enemies or walking through a field, you watch a video that highlights the most memorable moments from the featured Final Fantasy game.  The selected songs are popular themes from the game that people tend to think about when they think of that particular entry, i.e. “Sutaki da ne,” “Aerith’s Theme,” and “Answers” from Final Fantasy XIV.  The best, by far, appears in Curtain Call.  It’s a gorgeous medley of Final Fantasy themes played over highlights from the entire franchise.  If you’re a fan of any Final Fantasy games, I dare you not to cry while watching it.

It’s worth mentioning that the way you progress through the game changed in a few significant ways from the first Theatrhythm to Curtain Call.  In the original game, you could select any of the main musical stages for each of the games featured in Theatrhythm, from the original Final Fantasy to XIII.  However, once you committed yourself to one of the entries, i.e. Final Fantasy IX, you had to play through all three musical stages before being allowed to go back and play whichever one you wanted.

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Women in Gaming Industry: Aya Kyogoku

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Women in Gaming Industry: Aya Kyogoku

kyogoku-streetpass-mii-plaza I have a lot of respect for anyone who makes a living writing.  I also have a lot of respect for anyone who makes their living in the gaming industry. Someone who is a script writer for games is awe-worthy to me due to the difficulty of both fields, let alone combining them. Aya Kyogoku has been officially working for Nintendo in that capacity since 2003. During this time, she has helped to give us many successful and, quite frankly, fun games throughout the years.

Kyogoku is a native of Japan, where she honed her skills for working in the gaming industry. After joining Nintendo, she worked for the Entertainment Analysis & Development portion of the company. Kyogoku has been a huge asset to the company in a few different roles since being hired. As well as script writing, she has also co-directed a truly adorable game. Yes, I am talking the ever popular series Animal Crossing.

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Who doesn’t want to become mayor of their own perfect world? Especially if you get to  be around adorable animated characters. Well, that is what you get to do in the Animal Crossing franchise. Kyogoku co-directed Animal Crossing: New Leaf , which introduced all new characters and a new setting. She also used this game as a way to address diversity in the gaming world. In this interview, Kyogoku talks about why she continues to want a workplace where many ideas are able to be shared.Aya-kyogoku (1)

Kyogoku has also worked on two games in the ever popular The Legend of Zelda franchise. In The Legend of Zelda: The Twilight Princess, Link must try to save Hyrule from being engulfed by a parallel universe. In The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventure Link goes to once more restore peace in Hyrule. Both games were critically acclaimed and enjoyed by most fans.

Aya Kyogoku is a hard working and creative force in the gaming industry. She is a voice for greater diversity. We in the gaming world are lucky to have her fun-loving presence in one of our biggest companies!

Always keep sparkling!  

Nintendo Switch is Coming and I’m Actually Excited

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So, we know what it’s going to look like, and how much it’s going to cost.  We know what some of the games will be, and what they’ll look like, and I am actually looking forward to a console for the first time in awhile.  At the time the Wii U came out, we already had a PlayStation and there just wasn’t any games coming out on it that caught my eye.  Now we have the Switch coming, and Breath of the Wild.  Of course I’ve been burned before, buying a system for one game, so I’m doing my best to keep my enthusiasm in reasonable check.

I’m intrigued by the idea of a convertible sort of console, something we can take from a portable to TV-connected unit on the fly.  I’m glad to see that the controllers don’t look like the concept that was leaked early on.  Something as flat as the original concept would be awful.  I have an NES Classic, and I forgot how much those old controllers were hell on the hands.  Especially hands now suffering from Carpal Tunnel.

I’m not huge into portable gaming devices, but that could be because I never really have the money to own a console and a handheld.  I borrowed a PSP to play Final Fantasy II (the only way to get the original now) and I actually liked being able to game while I was doing something else.  I haven’t had a use for one before, but maybe with this system I’ll find a time to use both.  I think a lot of people are like me, only enough money for one system, buy maybe having a use for both.

The pricing looks good for a console of this type of versatility.  I’m a little concerned about extras though.  I’m sure there’s a lot of money to be made on cases, extra cords, controllers and screen protectors.  I haven’t owned a Nintendo system since the Game Cube, but they were always good about including what you need and making the extras just that, extras.  Of course it’s been awhile so I’ll have to see how things turn out as we get closer to release.

There are some concerns.  Paid online features, no Ethernet, and graphics issues.  For the first two I’m not too worried.  I do my online gaming on PC and I don’t expect that to change.  The types of games I tend to play on console aren’t multiplayer anyway.  Graphics concerns about preview footage from a game still in development isn’t much of a worry for me either.  People are doing a lot of comparisons of different previews of Breath of the Wild and showing how older graphics look better than the newer.  It’s not the first time, so it’s hardly any indication of whether the console will be good or not.

So, what do you think?  Are you as excited for this  as I am?  Has it brought back the Nintendo fanboy or fangirl in you?  I’m not positive yet, but it has definitely given me reason to watch closely.

Set Nostalgia to Maximum with the NES Classic

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So I managed to land a NES Classic recently through pure luck.  Walmart found some stock, or had some left over, and was running a deal every day for a week or so.  Log in at 5 PM central, click buy, and if you were the first of 25 or 50 you got one.  I managed to get on the site on the last day, right on time and get one.  So it arrived two days ago (as of this writing), and of course, like a little kid on Christmas morning, I couldn’t wait to plug it in.

The ‘console’ itself fits in the palm of your hand.  Hookup is easy, just an HDMI cord and power.  The nice thing is the power is like a USB/standard power cord similar to what some cell phones have.  That way you can plug it into an outlet or a power USB port.  Between that and the 3 ft controller, I think they intended people to hook this up to their desktop monitor and play it there.  Like the old-school gamer that I am, I hooked it up to my TV.  Then I proceeded to sit close, probably just like I did back in 80-whatever when we got our NES for Christmas, and got to playing.

Scrolling through the 30 games pre-installed on the little replica was a trip through memory lane, but firing up the first game was like being ten again.  I fired up Punch-Out and proceeded to play with the biggest dopey grin on my face.  It was shameless, laughing and mashing the two red buttons for all I was worth.  The music and graphics took me back to a time when video games were still a fairly new wonder.  I didn’t get far, because I had long forgotten how to beat some of the fighters from all those years ago.

Just last night I played about 45 minutes of Legend of Zelda, one of the first games we had on our old NES.  I’ll be doing a lot of playing of that one, but it was actually the few minutes I spent on Dr. Mario that hit me the most.  It wasn’t my favorite game, but it was fun.  The music was kind of annoying, and the gameplay a bit repetitive, but it was my mother’s favorite game.  Ever since we lost her back in April, I’ve been looking for every little connection I can to the good memories stored away after all these years.  This is definitely one of them.

My brother and I thought it was so cool that our parents liked video games.  They bought us our first consoles of course, actually buying the Atari 5200 probably more for themselves.  Watching, and playing Dr. Mario with my mom is one of those good memories.  It probably sticks with me the most because of the music.  Completely unforgettable, ingrained in our consciousness almost, is music from those old games we love.  Like the Super Mario Bros theme, Legend of Zelda, or the classical music from Tetris, they just stick with us much more than a lot of modern games.

Games have had a huge impact on people’s lives, right down to creating memories that we carry with us for years.  Some people like to discount nostalgia, or the affect it can have on a person.  All I can say is cherish those memories you make while gaming.  Hold on tight to the afternoons playing 4 player split FPS on the TV with your friends or playing head-to-head Super Mario with your sibling to see how fast you can beat it.  Those memories are just as important as any part of our lives and can sometimes bring a smile to your face when you need it most.  It certainly did for me.

Nintendo, Scalpers, and Retailers Fail the NES Classic Release

 

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Every once in awhile a company, or store, fails spectacularly in anticipating consumer demand for a product.  This time it was the NES Classic Edition, hyped like crazy for months now, and sold out in minutes at every retailer.  This time it was like a perfect storm, a trifecta of fails that left expectant gamers without their NES Classic.  Nintendo failed to ship enough, the retailers failed to anticipate an issue and put a limit on purchases, but worse is scalpers took advantage of the situation to make a huge profit.  Some people were reporting units going for as much as $1000 or more on eBay.

Of course it’s natural to want to blame Nintendo, they should have shipped more.  Why they didn’t anticipate demand, I don’t know.  Chris Grant at Polygon says there’s only two reasons…incompetent or underhanded.  Well, I’m not so cynical.  First, we all know Nintendo’s not incompetent.  They’ve managed to become one of the most well-known names in gaming, and have been around longer than most gaming companies.  You don’t accomplish that if you’re incompetent.  As for underhanded?  What’s the benefit?  Doing something underhanded implies that you have ill-intent toward someone which is to your benefit.  How exactly does it benefit Nintendo to only sell a fraction of the units they would have sold had they produced more?  Fact is we don’t know why.  Maybe retailers didn’t order enough, or production issues kept them from reaching a goal before release, or a number of other reasons that they could have failed.  Contrary to what Chris says, there are more than two options.

Then we have the stores.  Retailers like Target, Wal-Mart and Amazon didn’t put a limit on the number a person can buy.  So people could buy 5, keep 1, and put 4 on eBay to let the bidding get to ridiculous highs.  It’s similar to the failure with the Nuka Cola that was being bought up by employees at Target, and often resold online for a higher price.  Then again, did they even anticipate a run on the console?  Without spending a lot of time crunching numbers about a novelty legacy console releasing a couple of months before Christmas, I can’t possibly know what would have been expected.  Hell, did anyone at either Nintendo or the big retailers know how popular retro gaming has become? Obviously they had some idea or why release the console in the first place, but retro gaming is making a pretty big comeback.  Maybe they just didn’t have any idea how big.

I can’t really fault either of these two groups for anything more than not paying attention to the market and failing to anticipate demand.  Scalpers though, those people intentionally took advantage of the situation, and if you ask me that’s pretty damn underhanded.  Sure, free market and all that, but I’m not saying they don’t have the right to be jerks about it.  Just noting that this kind of crap sucks.  We see it with ticket sales more and more now.  I recently tried to get tickets to an upcoming concert, but a ticket scalping company had bought all the general admission tickets and were selling them at a much higher price.  Even setting their website name to be similar to the concert venue so it looked like you were buying tickets right from the convention center.

That’s really what bugs me the most about this situation.  This wasn’t a mistake, or a failure in judgement.  This was an intentional act to make a profit on gamers who rushed to the store only to find the console sold out.  That’s an awful thing to do if you ask me, and I hope with the units coming soon, the retailers handle it a little better next time.

That’s the silver lining to this thing.  Just this week Wal-Mart had more units that they put on sale each day at a particular time, and Nintendo has promised to ship more before Christmas.  I know I am looking forward to getting mine, so I hope everyone does a better job.  As for the scalpers, don’t buy those consoles for that price.  Let those guys sit on the units, hopefully for a long time, until they’re worthless because the market is flooded with them.

Convention Impressions: Too Many Games 2016

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Date: June 24 – 26, 2016
Venue: Oaks Convention Center in Oaks, PA

Real Women of Gaming is getting on the convention beat! Our first Press Pass came from Too Many Games and it was a great convention for us to get our feet wet with.

What Kind of Convention is it?
As the name suggests, Too Many Games is a gaming convention. The Convention had 3 panel tracks and an event stage, but the majority of the space was given over to a large gaming room and an even larger marketplace. The arcade/gaming room had arcade machines and consoles running fighting games, racing games, and rhythm games for anyone to test their skills against their fellow con goers. There were also at least 30 machines running various versions of Nintendo’s beloved Super Smash Brothers for both free and tournament play. Rounding things out were a tabletop gaming area and a indie game showcase.

Too Many Games is definitely a small convention. The focus is on the games room and the marketplace. The convention did manage a respectable lineup of guests from the gaming youtube and podcast ‘verse including The Completionist and the Angry Video Game Rolfe, but don’t expect representation from major studios or established indie studios. Sorry, no autographs from Ken Levine or surprise game announcements from Double Fine.

The panel tracks covered a decent range of topics but didn’t offer anything you wouldn’t typically find at a small enthusiast convention. There were Guest FAQs, retrospectives, music and animation appreciation panels, and discussions about current topics. It was a full schedule but I’m guessing that the fairly sparsely attended panels were not the draw for most people at the con.

What was cool?
By far my favorite part was the Indie Games showcase. I got to spend time with at least twenty developers of both video and tabletop games, trying their games and talking to them about their projects. The items on offer ranged from rough prototypes to extremely polished and professional demos. Everyone I met was eager to show off their work and talk about what they wanted to accomplish, what their influences were, and what got them into game design in the first place. There were definitely a few creators there whose projects I will be following closely from now on and some of them may even be featured in future posts on this blog.

The marketplace had a heavy focus on retro video games and I saw a few rare finds on offer. If you’re a collector then you already know that events like these can be a goldmine or a bust depending on what the vendors have on offer. Board games also had decent representation and I was pleased to see a few items that I had been keeping an eye out for. There were also a few booths selling figures and other collectables and, of course, enough funny t-shirts to clothe an army.

I also liked the arcade more than I thought I would. I’ve never been a big fighting game fan, but there was enough variety that I could find plenty to keep me occupied. There were also a few Japanese rhythm game cabinets which were in high demand. Fortunately, I never had to wait too long for a turn at a cabinet and there was always someone ready to jump in and play a round with me. (I lost, a lot).

What was lame?
The venue itself is nothing to write home about. The Oaks Convention Center is essentially a big steel warehouse with concrete floors. Because the convention was divided between two large halls, one for the marketplace and indie showcase and one for the arcade and event stage, it could be awkward getting around. The bathroom lines could get pretty long (it is a con) and the food was overpriced and mediocre (again, con). That said, it’s not the worst place to hold a convention, but it’s not as interesting or cool a venue as some that I have been to.

Who is it for?
If you are all about buying and playing games, this is a great convention. There was a lot on offer to play and over 50 vendors in the marketplace, making the whole thing feel like a big swapmeet. If you are interested in indie games or talking about game making with the people who are doing it right now, then the Indie Showcase alone is worth getting a ticket. There were concerts and cosplay wrestling, so if those kinds of shows are your thing then that’s a decent reason to attend. Just expect to kill some time in the arcade and marketplace between shows you want to see.

If you are more interested in the cosplay scene, community meetups, or people watching, then Too Many Games is hard to recommend. The venue is bad for photography and there wasn’t a lot of cosplay around. Aside from smash tournaments and a pokemon event, there wasn’t a whole lot in the way of organized community meetups either.

Did you like it?
I definitely did. Too Many Games felt kind of like someone had taken the gameroom and dealers hall from a larger convention and turned them into their own thing. I’m used to attending conventions that are a little more scattershot in what they offer and it was cool attending a convention that had a strong focus on gaming. I also liked the fact that I could get to things that looked interesting without fighting through fifteen thousand other people to get to it. Sometimes small conventions can feel empty or like they needed to stretch their content but Too Many Games stayed engaging and entertaining for the whole time.

MaxUrso’s Top 10 Rants From E3

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MaxUrso’s Top 10 Rants From E3

top 10 e3 rants

I’ve said it before: I’m an old gamer. I’m not old enough to remember Pong, but close. The start of each school year found my friend Eric and me exchanging news of what arcade games we had seen in our summer travels. One year it was a boxing game with a swivel mounted monitor. You controlled two arms and had to duck and weave. Now each year I look forward to the news from E3, anxious to see what technology is coming, what titles I’ll be waiting for. This year I’m disappointed. There’s nothing from the highlights that has me excited. On the contrary, I’m finding myself rather annoyed. In no particular order, here are my Top 10 E3 Rants:

10: Microsoft is putting out the Xbox One S.

It’s 40% smaller, has an internal power supply,  and puts out in 4k resolution with HDR. 4k is the latest thing, and I’ve read we really can’t see the difference in resolution that great, so I’ll pass. What has me irked is not only the size of the console, but the INTERNAL power supply. Come Fricking ON! The real estate at my gaming station is so cramped I can’t reach for my ice cold beverage without bumping the power button on my Xbox One. I hate power bricks. If they could make the whole thing smaller and still put the brick inside, why didn’t they do that to begin with?

9: While Xbox is putting out a 4k monster machine with Project Scorpio, Sony is showing off a VR headset.

Wonderful, another new fad that everyone will be jumping on. Does it have to cost as much as the console?! Is VR really worth that much?  I’m sure it will make Final Fantasy 15 really stand out among the rest of the sequels, reboots, and re-mastered games.

8: Speaking of which, there’s God of War.

Kratos has taken off to invade Skyrim it seems and he’s dragging along his kid. Didn’t his family die…at his own hands? Isn’t he covered in their ashes? Is this kid really safe with this god-killer? Who’s going to call Child Protective Services?

7: Perhaps Link will in The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild.

There has to be phone somewhere in this open-world version of Hyrule. It is still Hyrule, right? I mean I can’t be sure, but if Nintendo is finally putting their money maker in an open-world/climb the walls like Assassin’s Creed style game, I wouldn’t be surprised if they changed which world it was in. At least other companies showed off more than one game.

6:  Take EA for example: They had lots of games at E3.

Battlefield 1. Wait what? The series started with Battlefield 1942 back in 2002 and now, 14 years later they’re retconning the whole thing and putting out Battlefield 1?! Sequels normally go up in digits, right Titanfall 2, and Fifa 17? They could also just use the intellectual property and just add a new sub-title, like Mass Effect: Andromeda or whatever laundry list of Star Wars games they’ll put out.

5: Even Bethesda, my current favorite company is resorting to the recycle machine that plagues both video games and Hollywood.

Another Prey that sounds like a reboot and Dishonored 2 gives us another sequel while Skyrim is simply being re-mastered. At least Quake Champions is original…oh wait, another 4 on 4 shooter. Lovely. Fallout 4 and Doom get the VR treatment here as well and that’s a few hundred I don’t have, so pass.

4: Perhaps the rebels at Ubisoft will save us with an original idea?

Star Trek VR puts us in control of the bridge crew. Fine, but it’s VR.  Watch Dogs 2 takes us to San Francisco, or we could head back to Colorado for South Park: The Fractured But Whole and engage in a kids version of Captain America: Civil War. Perhaps one of the snipers from Ghost Recon: Wildlands, another sequel, will put me out of misery. If I’m left with only Steep, an extreme sports title, to keep me interested, then I am doomed.

3: Activision, not satisfied with one re-mastered title, is being back and entire series: Crash Bandicoot, Crash Bandicoot 2: Cortex Strikes Back, and Crash Bandicoot: Warped.

There’s also another Call of Duty, and Skylanders. Even Disney gave up on the collectible figure gimmick.

2: Repackage, reboot, repeat, resell.

Can nobody create a new game? The list of the rehashed is huge: Call of Duty : Modern Warfare Remastered, Civilization VI, Crackdown 3 Dead Island 2, Deus Ex: Mankind Divided, Gears of War 4, Halo Wars 2, Mafia III, Mass Effect: Andromeda, Pro Evolution Soccer 2017, and another Forza title.

1: Now, I’m no prude, and most of my friends would tell you I can be pretty vulgar when it’s funny, but Naughty America had a VR booth at E3. Really?

An adult film studio had a booth at the Electronic Entertainment Expo? Isn’t there another venue for this; somewhere better suited like…Fallout: New Vegas? Maybe that’s why it’s finally getting backwards compatibility on the Xbox One.

Let us know your opinion in the comments below!