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Review: The Ritual on Weylyn Island

Dev. by: zemaGamez
Platform: PC
Release Date: Dec. 4, 2015

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This horror game came out just last month and I couldn’t wait to get my hands on it. The Ritual on Weylyn Island combines the idea of Slender: The Eight Pages with black magic rituals, creating a scary story of epic proportions.

What’s it about?
The Ritual on Weylyn Island follows Moira, a 22-year-old woman who travels to Blessed Island to help her remaining family members settle the death of their patriarch, her grandfather. When she arrives, however, the house is in ruins, with strange symbols on the walls in blood, and her family is nowhere to be found. Your goal is to find your twin sister, Rowena, and get off the island.

What did I think?
This game is absolutely terrifying. I would say it’s even worse than Slender: The Arrival and you all know how that game affected me. The mixture of a dread-inducing score, gut-wrenching graphics and horrifying whispers leaves you on the edge of your seat.

Instead of finding notes, you find tapes for a walkman you pick up in the beginning of the game. This is a nice change from finding notes in other horror games because you don’t have to read anything. You can continue to explore the area or meet your objective while the information you need is being told to you.

The story itself is interesting, too. It’s Moira’s goal to become close with her sister once more, but when Rowena is nowhere to be found, Moira has to brave the unknown to rescue her. Along the way, we get little snippets of what’s happening on the island with some jump scares peppered in.

Do I recommend it?
Oh, yes. If you liked being scared out of your wits, this is the game for you. The graphics are good, the story is interesting and the concept is very well done. You can find The Ritual on Weylyn Island on Steam.

Why I Love Horror Games

Why I Love Horror Games

You all know that I absolutely love doing my weekly Wanna Don’t Wanna broadcast. Any of you that have watched me play know that I’m just riveted by games like Slender: The Arrival and Layers of Fear. But, did you know that I played my first ever horror game just a week before my first broadcast?

It’s true. My first horror game was The Park and I played it just a week before you all watched me play it, in order to see if I could handle our show idea. I found that not only could I handle it but also that I’d become addicted to horror games.

Before, I stayed away from horror video games. I always thought that playing was worse than watching because you’re more engaged and it becomes more real. Now, I watch horror Let’s Plays on YouTube, I’m always looking for new horror games to play on Twitch, and I spend my days combing through YouTube channels for new game ideas. I can’t get enough of it.

Playing horror games is different than watching horror movies or horror gameplay on YouTube. Not only are you more engaged, so you’re more likely to jump or scream, but also, when it’s finished, you really feel a sense of completion. At the end of a horror movie, I’ll see the villain defeated (most of the time), but I’ll still have trouble sleeping that night because I can’t help but think, “But maybe it’s still alive!” When I play a horror game, however, I play a roll in defeating the villain, so I leave the game knowing that I’m okay.

Also, being a huge horror movie fan and the co-writer of 9th Circle of Horror’s 15 Rules to Survive a Horror Movie, I have a sense of comfort knowing that I’m able to control the actions of the main character. If I’m in control, things are more likely to turn out okay in the end.

Not to mention, I get a huge rush from the jump scares. Yay, adrenaline, right?!

-Vanri the Rogue

Review: Layers of Fear (Part 2 – ENDING)

Review: Layers of Fear (Part 2 – ENDING)

Yesterday, I finally finished Layers of Fear. After just over 2.5 hours of playing, I was not disappointed!

**This Review Contains Spoilers!**

What’s the second half about?
In the second half, you’re trying to find the remaining items you need to finish your painting. Since the game is not finished, there are only 4 items to find. In the first half, I found skin for the canvas and a vial of blood for the paint. In this half, I found a bone, which was to be ground up into dust for painting and priming, and a lock of hair for the brush. This half of the game featured dolls pretty heavily, since the final items both had to do with the main character’s daughter.

What did I think?
This game is absolutely stunning. The graphics are amazing, but I was most impressed by the constant changing of the house. In the first half, we saw that going through the same door may not lead to the same results. In this half, they stepped it up a notch. They were changing my surroundings while I was turning around, sometimes to the point where looking out the window allowed the whole room to be changed around me.

The jump scares in the second half are even scarier than the ones in the first half. You’re turning around to find dolls, ghosts and all sorts of scary things behind you, above you or beside you. You’re opening doors to find massive doll heads blocking your way. It’s absolutely terrifying.

The ending was nothing to get excited about, since the game isn’t finished. You’re basically walking down a hallway and the game cuts to black and lets you know that that’s all there is right now. I can’t wait for more updates. I can’t wait for the game to be finished.

Would I still recommend it?
Oh, hell yes. Buy this game. Play this game. Scream at this game. Just play it. It’s absolutely amazing. I’m not ready for it to be over and I can’t wait for more content.

Watch me play it here, here, here and here!

-Vanri the Rogue

Review: Layers of Fear (Part 1)

Review: Layers of Fear (Part 1)

Developer: Bloober Team SA
Platforms: PC, Xbox
Released: Aug 27, 2015

Layers of Fear is an early access, indie horror game created by Bloober Team SA. I watched a good amount of game play after it was first released and found it to be absolutely stunning. Because of this, I decided to play it for myself (and for all of you).

What’s it about?
Layers of Fear is a psychological horror game that follows a once-successful painter as he attempts to finish his pièce de résistance. You explore his ever-changing house, looking for the six items that will allow you to finish your painting. Along the way, you delve into the demented mind of the main character; you discover notes and newspaper articles that tell the story of this artist and his family; and you experience strange and paranormal phenomena.

What did I think?
I’ve only finished about a third of the game so far, so I can only give you my thoughts on the beginning. As I play more, however, I will be posting more about what I think.

That being said, this game is stunning. It is surprisingly easy to play for not being completed. The graphics are amazing, the story is thorough and creepy and the jump scares are absolutely terrifying.

The amount of exploration in the game can become a bit tedious. There are some notes and newspaper clippings in a few drawers, so you end up having to open every single drawer and cabinet in order to find them. And there are drawers and cabinets all over the place. In this aspect, it’s a lot like Amnesia: The Dark Descent.

Unlike Amnesia: The Dark Descent, however, there’s a lot more happening in this game. While the exploration part of it might be a little boring, the game itself is not. It kept me on my toes, which kept me interested. This game genuinely scares me, which is the highest compliment I can give a horror game.

Do I recommend it?
Oh, yes. You can find it on Steam for $12.99. It’s definitely worth the money.

-Vanri the Rogue

Review: Amnesia: The Dark Descent

Review: Amnesia: The Dark Descent

Amnesia: The Dark Descent is a survival horror game from Frictional Games. I decided to play it for our Wanna Don’t Wanna broadcast because it was only a few dollars on steam. I hadn’t heard much about the game, so I didn’t know what to expect.

What’s it about?
You play as Daniel, a young man who’s lost his memories. You have to explore a stone castle for clues about a man named Alexander. You find letters written by your pre-amnesiac self, instructing you to kill Alexander. You also have to collect tinderboxes, oil for your lantern, and chemicals that you can mix into a corrosive acid. All the while, you’re running away from Alexander’s “shadow,” which is basically his astral projection.

What did I think?
This game is super boring. It’s quiet, with only the occasional creepy noise. You find yourself going in circles, without anything new to guide you. It’s more about exploring than actually escaping anything scary, which is a little too low-key for a horror game.

The graphics reminded me of Quake (1996), which shouldn’t be the case for a game released in 2010. The lower quality took away from the experience. I didn’t find myself scared or on edge at all.

Also, the camera movements were such that I felt motion sick while playing. This has a tendency of happening with First Person Shooter games, but rarely happens in first person horror games.

Would I recommend it?
No. Don’t play this game. It’s a waste of time. Spend your money and time on something better.

Watch me play it here:

-Vanri the Rogue

Slender: The Arrival Review

Slender: The Arrival Review

I’ve always been terrified of the idea of Slenderman. I mean, he just shows up randomly, stalks you for years, driving you crazy, then kills you. That’s frightening!

When I heard of Slender: The Arrival, I vowed to never, ever in my life play it.

So, naturally, I’m playing it for you guys.

What’s it about?
Slender: The Arrival is a first person survival game based around the Slenderman mythos. In the game, you play as CR and you have to search for clues in regards to the disappearance of Kate, a friend from childhood. You wander around the forest looking for pages while trying to stay as far away from Slender as you possibly can.

It’s terrifying.

What did I think?
This game is amazing. The graphics are good and creepy, the music is anxiety-inducing and the subject matter is bone-chilling. I was on the edge of my seat the entire time.

The game developers really know how to make you scream. Every time my camera pulsed or I saw a glimpse of Slender’s hand, I about jumped out of my skin. The music doesn’t help at all. I was instinctively tense and even ended up being startled by floorboards creaking in my own house.

Do I recommend it?
So far, yes. Definitely. If you like having the piss scared out of you, definitely get this game. I will post more about it after I’ve played more of the game.

Keep an eye on our Twitch channel as well as on YouTube for future game play of Slender: The Arrival. In the meantime, watch me jump here:

-Vanri the Rogue

Knock-knock Review

Knock-knock Review

Released: October 4, 2013
Published by: Ice-pick Lodge
Platform: PC, PS4

Knock-knock is a horror game centered around an insomniac who is forced to wander around his house while trying to reassure himself that nothing sinister is happening. The game was successfully funded on Kickstarter in September 2012, which allowed for its release the following year. More recently, in September of this year, the game became available on the PS4, which marks Ice-pick Lodge’s first game on a console.

What’s it about?
Knock-knock is about a cabin deep in the woods that has been home to 3 generations of lodgers. The present lodger begins to notice strange things about his once-familiar surroundings. Creepy noises are heard, things are missing and, at night, it seems that someone else has made the cabin their home, too.

The objective of the game is to stay awake and sane until dawn. You must wander the rooms and repair light bulbs, start clocks and avoid the gruesome guests that your Lodger does not want to see. You must solve the puzzle and find the answers to why everything has become so strange.

What’s the idea?
According to Ice-pick Lodge’s website, the idea came about from an anonymous email. This email challenged the team to make an unconventional game based on enclosed materials. The attached folder, titled “lestplay,” included text, audio files and video footage. The email specified that all of the files had to be used in the game, but gave them no other restrictions.

What did I think?
I had no idea what I was doing in this game. Granted, I did not know it was a puzzle game before I started playing because I was keeping myself in the dark intentionally. That being said, I’m not good at puzzle games. I couldn’t figure out what I was supposed to do. I even looked up walkthroughs that were telling me things I already knew, but not telling me how to apply that knowledge to the game. The biggest tip was that I was supposed to listen for audio clues, but I couldn’t figure out what those clues were.

Despite my personal experience and my lack of talent with puzzle games, Knock-knock is a very clever game. It’s visually stunning and absolutely terrifying. It’s an unconventional idea that turned into something amazingly beautiful. I can say that, if I had been able to get passed the 4th level, I wouldn’t have been able to put this game down (of course, I couldn’t get passed level 4 and I ended up rage quitting).

Do I recommend it?
Oh, yes. If you can solve puzzles with patience and ease, this is the game for you. Even if you can’t, you should really look into it, if only to see the design and the concept.

You can find Knock-knock on Steam, the Apple Store, Google Play, the Windows Store and PS4.

Watch me play it here:

Maybe I’ll watch some gameplay online and try it again. Do you think I should? Let me know in the comments!

-Vanri the Rogue