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Tag Archives: Women

Communities for Marginalized Groups: Why This Matters

CommunitesForMarginalizedGroups

“Why have a gender specific group?”

I’d like to think the answer to this was obvious, but it is quite clear that this is not the case. Perhaps, we don’t need to explain, but more so make it clear. Communities for women, minorities, LGBTQ+ and other marginalized peoples exist for a purpose.

The purpose is not to exclude others, but for these groups of people to find a place where those around them have empathy, understanding and experience in the same struggles they have. In a perfect world, everyone would have empathy and understanding for everyone, but no one’s experience in this world is the same. To those that are marginalized, the gaming community as a whole can sometimes be an unkind place. These types of communities help give a voice to those that feel they are not heard and give them strength, power and confidence to face a world that, at times, can be hostile towards their very existence.

We live in a time where inequality is so clear and in our face, yet those that hold the majority, the power, hesitate at times to do anything to help. Such groups finding voices among peers helps them vocalize with those who need to see their value in the rest of the world. We belong, we exist and we are important.

Finding a place where one belongs has always been something each of us strive for. Some of us will find that sense of belonging in various groups made up of various people, others will find that sense of empowerment amongst those that perhaps have experienced the world as they have… what matters is these communities help you grow and find your voice in a world that can make you feel like you’ll never be heard.

When it comes to the gaming world it is a much more concentrated level of negative experiences for those that put themselves out there as female, PoC, LGBTQ+ and those with disabilities.

I know my personal experiences as a woman of color have been nothing like many of my white male counter parts. This was expected when I chose to stream with a camera, but the level to which it came. It surprised my husband and friends who are not PoC. It surprised them more than it could have ever surprised me.

That is where a community comes in. Because, though non-PoC can see what is wrong, they can’t fully understand the effect not only in the gaming world but also in the world in general when so many still think and act in such a manner towards PoC, women, LGBTQ+ and those with disabilities. These are unique experiences in each of these communities. Helping those around us understand that these experiences happen and what those outside such a community can do to be an ally is very much needed.

Communities give strength to those that need it and sanity to those that may question themselves when encountering these negative experiences. They have experienced that feeling of anxiety, anger and hurt when someone joins a public chat and questions your femininity, or calls you a slur. When someone tries to put you in your place with words or even going as far as harming you beyond a computer screen, thinking we owe them something for just existing.

Though we don’t owe you an explanation, we will explain because we want you as an ally. We want you to understand as much as you are able. We want you to realize we aren’t excluding you from something, but finding a place where we feel safe and accepted, even if it’s just a forum online for a few moments a day. Having that kind of touch stone is important for everyone. It is sometimes harder for marginalized groups to find that kind of connection with one another because the feeling of being isolated can become all encompassing. There is bravery in reaching out for help and support. Communities for marginalized peoples give just a bit more help and support then a general community can give.  

In the gaming world, as this pertains to that, our allies are everywhere. They are helping us, supporting us as regulars, mods and larger community members. We value them a great deal. It shows the world is capable of change and can be a better place. Minority specific communities are not meant to block us off from the rest of the world, but to simply help us navigate it. Participating in one, as well as many different kinds, of these communities gives us the perspective and tools to react to the world around us.

In the end, what one should take away from seeing that there are such specific communities in the gaming world is that they are very much needed and many of them are helping to better the gaming community as a whole. Which is a good thing for everyone.

So how can you be an ally? (Not to sound repetitive, if you’ve read my last piece) Be supportive. When in someone’s stream that is getting harassed, speak up, make it unacceptable behavior. Don’t question a community’s existence, but more so ask questions to try and understand those communities’ experiences. You know these people. You are friends and peers with these people and they have a perspective of the world that you may not understand. Most are willing to share their stories so that you might have a chance to understand. Most important of all: listen. Listen to why such communities need to exist. Just that act is so important to those that aren’t as often heard.

Influential Women in the Gaming Industry- Kate Edwards

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In 2012, the International Game Developers Association needed a new director. Thankfully IGDA choose Kate Edwards. Really, it wasn’t a hard choice to elect Kate Edwards. She is a talented and intelligent person who uses her unique perspective to problem solve.

Kate Edwards really is an amazing brain. She is an applied geographer, writer, and content culturalization strategist. Kate’s background includes geography, cartography and geopolitics. She has traveled extensively which has given her wonderful perspective. All of this education and experience are tools that Kate successfully uses.

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After taking on the mantle of Director of IGDA Kate used her power in the best way. For the betterment of those who didn’t have a voice in the industry. She forayed her raining and talents to help tackle some very difficult problems for the network of the world’s game developers. Kate took a firm stand about Gamergate and sexism in the gaming industry. She also was outspoken about the topics of diversity and unpaid “crunch” time

Kate resigned as Director of the IGDA in 2017. She stated; “I felt it’s time for me to move on. When I first took the IGDA role, I told the board that this is likely a three- to five-year mission for me, and here I am nearly at five years. My top goals were to reinvigorate the IGDA’s relevance, reinstate the IGDA’s core mission as an advocacy org and voice for game developers (not companies), and to emphasize the ‘I’ part of the IGDA and strengthen our international presence.” Kate believed that after five years it was time for someone with a different skill set to help IGDA continue to move forward.

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In short Kate Edwards has made our world a little better place through her hard work at IGDA. She took an unflinching stand against injustice. She made the road a little easier for those in the gaming industry moving forward. Kate has shown us that by being brave and hard working you can make a change in the gaming industry. She has also had a good time doing it in cosplay.

Always keep sparkling!

Representation in Video Games, a Female Perspective

People complain that feminists call “misogyny!” about everything. The truth is, misogyny and sexism are so systemically ingrained in our culture that both men and women actively participate in patriarchal values, without realization or intention. Many people either don’t see it or they simply disregard it as “the way things are” and make no move to change it. That is why I wholeheartedly agree with the second argument in the image below:

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The analogy rings quite true. As a female gamer myself, it is often extremely difficult to find representation in the gaming world. And, to be quite honest, representation is actually extremely important. Not only is a lack of female characters telling me that my demographic isn’t important enough to warrant thought, but it is also depriving young girls and other minorities of role models they can relate to. When children are growing up, they choose people to look up to. If they are constantly seeing characters who look like them being excluded or portrayed as inferior, they start to feel inferior and thus internalize misogyny (or other forms of bigotry like racism and homophobia), which can sometimes be more dangerous to their well being than external discrimination.

In the current market, the majority of video game role models are white male characters. Do only white males play video games? No. So why do video games and consoles continue to be marketed almost exclusively to them?

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Understanding the question

Gaia LogoSo many times I have sat and had the same conversation with Vanri the Rogue and that conversation might surprise you. It’s a conversation that I am sure happens a lot; a conversation that should happen if you don’t understand the topic.

I didn’t understand feminism. I didn’t get it. I innocently thought it wasn’t for me in any way, shape or form. I thought, like so many others, that it was a bunch of – pardon the phrase – feminazis who were demanding everything in the world be un-girly. We honestly have such screwed up views as to what it actually is because there is no positive explanation of it in our everyday lives. When it’s brought up or portrayed, it is always given a negative undertone or worse (to me), chalked up to ‘girl power.’ *shudder* Not everything females do can be summed up in a Spice Girls song.

Well, Vanri sat me down and schooled me. She did this after I had said for the millionth time, ‘I’m not a feminist.’ She looked at me and said, ‘Oh, dear, Crymson but you are.’ Ok, maybe not just like that, but you get the gist. She sat there and listed off all of the feminist things that I do on a daily basis. You know what #1 was? If you guessed Real Women of Gaming, you’d be right. Talk about a wake up call.

This is what she explained or, more importantly, how I understood what she explained.

Feminism is the right to choose, to decide. She explained that it isn’t unfeminine to be a stripper (which I totally assumed), it’s oppressive to not have the ability to decide if you want to be a stripper or not.

I was seriously floored. Was it really that simple? Yeah, apparently it is. When we lack the ability to make those decisions, the same ability men have, then it is oppression.

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