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Category Archives: Op-Ed

Triggers: Mental Health & Gaming

I love Horror. I don’t think that’s a shock to anyone. I’ve avoided a lot of horror games for various reasons, mainly because I’m a bit high strung and anxious. Reason for that? I live with Complex Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (c-PTSD), it comes with anxiety.

When I started my stream with The Blair Witch game, everything was fine. I was a bit anxious because I was going in a little bit blind. Don’t worry, I won’t spoil anything important. I explored and got confused, but as I roamed the woods the main character loses sight of his dog and begins to have a PTSD episode.

Most people won’t think anything of it. It’s just a stressed moment for a video game character. However, to me, it’s much more than that. I was unaware that he had PTSD and if I were aware I wouldn’t have started playing it. I confirmed with the chat that he did indeed have PTSD and apologized to everyone and switched the game. Had it not been for Vanri sitting in voice chat with me (to help ease my anxiety) suggesting that I stop playing, I may have tried to force my way through the game.

That would have been a terrible idea. My anxiety was high from watching him have this episode and as I continued on to look for the dog, it was getting worse. The visual effects were wonderful because his panic attack looks and sounded like mine. If I had continued further I probably would have been triggered into a panic attack or worse. So I jumped over to State of Decay 2 for the rest of my stream. 

The next night I decided to try Alien: Isolation. I was trying to get back into horror games and I’ve heard amazing things. About 2 hours in, I was overwhelmed by the atmospheric noise. I could feel a panic attack rising and I had to stop playing. Was there anything wrong with the game? No! The problem lies with my mental illness. I stopped playing the game and went back to State of Decay 2

You see, I like to think that I can do anything, but I have limitations. We found one when I played through Layers of Fear, an amazing game that I will always recommend. The subject matter was a lot more closely related to my own trauma than I realized. I wasn’t even aware that my attitude had changed toward everyone around me, but they pointed out that I was extremely agitated and my anxiety was high until I finished playing the game. So from that point forward, we had to look for specific elements in my horror games. If it wasn’t a first-person game, Vanri would play the game first to make sure that there wasn’t anything triggering in the storyline.

I assumed that it was the only thing I had to worry about, but to be honest, I didn’t even check to see if that was present in Blair Witch. Now, watching let’s plays or streams of these games are fine, but playing them is different. It’s the difference between watching and experiencing. It’s more immersive. I’d watched Layers of Fear on YouTube and Vanri’s playthroughs of it. I knew the story, but experiencing it was hard. I am lucky it didn’t bring up anything worse, like flashbacks. 

So a little extra medication this week and a hard lesson learned. There is a reason I don’t play horror games in which I can’t fight back. I’m not invincible and I have very real limitations. I need to research these games more before I jump right into them because I don’t want to trigger myself, whether I’m on stream or not. I have to make sure that there isn’t abuse, the characters don’t have PTSD or other mental disorders that could trigger mine, there isn’t abundant (though very well done) noise triggering anxiety.

More than that, I need to be okay with stepping away. I need to be okay with setting down the controller (figuratively) and putting myself first, putting my mental state first. To drop the tough act every now and then to ensure better mental wellness for myself and those around me. At the end of the day, that is my responsibility. I never know if something could trigger me, but how I handle those situations speaks volumes about the progress I’ve made and my self-awareness. I’m also thankful to have such amazing support that helps me make these decisions.

Again, and I cannot stress this enough, I am not upset at any of these games. It is not their fault that I was triggered. I am 100% responsible for my mental health in this regard. I view it the same way as a food allergy. Ask before you eat, just in case. Does this have nuts in it? Does this have abuse in it? 

So from now on, I will look into my horror games more. If everything seems okay, then I will play it, but if I am triggered I will allow myself to step back and stop playing. My community and viewers will understand and at the end of the day, I am more important. 

Are there any amazing games out there that have triggered you or things you should watch out for? Better yet, have a horror game to recommend that is void of my triggers? Let me know in the comments, but for now, back to Prey!

The Flip-side of the Harassment Coin: Being Too Eager

The Flip-side of the Harassment Coin: Being Too Eager

TT_NotTheFandom

TooEager

Click to Enlarge

I came across this image in my Twitter feed and it got me to thinking: I see this thing a lot.  Usually from over-eager guys that want to be allies, or support women who game.  Some people like to point and laugh at the obvious awkwardness of it, or call it desperate or whatever, but I rolled it around in my head for a bit and wanted to write something to show that there’s a part of this that is an issue for the gaming community and how we move forward as we continue to grow and more people get into gaming.

No one really denies that harassment happens.  It happens to men and women all the time online.  The type of harassment and extent/severity can vary depending on the community, platform, gender, age, and countless other variables.  It’s a shitty fact of life that we wish would go away, accept that it won’t, and do everything we can to help improve for everyone.  On the flip-side of that, to me, are people who are way too eager to please.  They want to be some sort of counter-balance to the negative, and in my opinion wind up just being another negative.

First, before we get into the meat of it though, I just want to touch on the last bit.  We don’t know Brian’s last name, and while I saw a picture of him with this image I left it out.  No need for us to identify Brian, but Brian, dude, you gotta relax with the ladies.  I find that the women in our community, the gamers and geeks, they tend to be very nice folks.  You don’t have to sell yourself, or say things like ‘Don’t be intimidated’ (which some of them might find an insulting assumption).  You don’t have to say you’re not stereotypical, you’re not setting up a date here.  Just be you, they’ll find out who you are that way.  Don’t assume they’re going to assume anything about you, whether it be your stance on the kitchen or your level of intimidation.  And, Brian, I hate to break it to you but while you say you aren’t a stereotypical guy, you kinda are here.  You’re the stereotype of the awkward geek guy who doesn’t know how to talk to girls.  Just relax and be you, man.

So, all that aside that wasn’t my real problem with this but it did come up when I started asking around to make sure it wasn’t just me that saw this as a bit of a issue.  I’m a guy, and while I can empathize, if I’m going to write an article I want to make sure I’m not assuming how this comes off to the women in the community.  I could guess, based on what I’ve read in the past, but it’s always best not to guess.  What I’ve found is women in our community that I talk to want to be accepted for their skill, how fun they are to game with, and the love of gaming.  Saying “I added you because you’re a female gamer” seemed to me to be almost as insulting as “I’m not going to play with you because you’re a female gamer”.  If you’re gaming and find out one of your squadmates, teammates, or someone else in game is a woman she most likely doesn’t want you to take notice because of that.  I know it’s still not that common to come across women in some genres, like FPS games, but fairly common in RPGs and MMOs.  Even then the last thing that they want to hear on voice is “Oh, it’s a girl! Yay, look everyone it’s a girl!”  They probably want to hear things like “Nice shot,” “Thanks for the assist,” and “Move your butt, we’re dying over here,” just like every other gamer.

While the reaction pictured above isn’t harassment, it’s the other swing of that pendulum that doesn’t help move us down the road.  Most of the gamers I know, men and women, want the community to be a place for everyone and anyone that wants to be a part of it.  I’ve often said, more games, with more gamers to play them with.  Just like women often don’t ‘come out’ in-game, or use voice because of harassment, I know some who would also feel just as uncomfortable with a reaction like the one above. I asked around just to make sure that I wasn’t making any assumptions, and not only do the women who game want to be taken more seriously than the image above, they also have a great sense of humor about the whole thing.

And two quotes from the Facebook group I brought this up in where I asked if it was just me or did the image come off as too much, and just as bad as looking down on female gamers because of their gender:

Ugh. “Don’t be intimidated”? Rude. Definitely not just you.

And:

Eh it’s 50/50. I’ve seen guys that are so extremely supportive of female gamers they go overboard with it. It’s happened to me a lot. They just want to make up for the rest of the community. Also hearing girls talk during matches is rare. It gets mistaken for intimidation but it’s typically just removing yourself from a potential situation due to pay experience. The kitchen comment might be am awkward nerds way of trying to be smooth. Open mouth, out falls dumb.

I could also be wrong

So guys, be supportive of the women who game, don’t look down on them because of their gender, but also don’t go so overboard that you become the other extreme.  They are gamers first, and the vast majority want to be treated just like every other gamer.  Don’t be jerks to anyone really, but also don’t treat them like they’re special unicorns that are only seen under a full moon.  You’re not helping any more than the guy that laughs at the idea that girls game.

Rust’s Lack of Player Choice Brings Out More Selective Outrage

Rust’s Lack of Player Choice Brings Out More Selective Outrage

TT_NotTheFandom

Player choice has always been a big issue in gaming, whether it be single player versus multiplayer, dedicated servers versus peer-to-peer, or being able to design your own character right down to the color of the freckles on their butt.  Some games do it better than others, and some games just don’t make sense to have a lot of choice, like a story-driven single player game such as Tomb Raider or Uncharted.  Out of all the game types, RPGs and MMOs have always been the best for player choices in character creation, design, and appearance so it was a surprise (to me anyway) when the developers of Rust announced that they were going to continue to randomly assign player avatars after the release of female character types.  Even in game franchises without the normal character creation of RPGs, players have asked for more choice, as in the case of Assassin’s Creed Unity back in 2014, and we all remember the fairly pathetic (in my opinion) excuse that it was too hard to do.

When the developer of Rust announced, after the release of female models, that character creation would not be part of the game, and players would continue to be randomly assigned a gender and race permanently for their avatar, it generated some of the expected outrage but also support from some surprising sources.  Unsurprisingly there are a few gamers that prefer to play characters that look like them, especially in MMOs and RPGs.  Whether it’s guys who want to play male characters, or women who want female avatars, or even people of various races and nationalities that want to make their avatar look like themselves.  On the flip-side of that are players that like to play characters that are different than themselves.  For me, depending on my mood, the character type, and game, I may choose to play a female character when I play RPGs, but in all of these cases, player choice is the key element.  There is an increasing number of players that want more choice, want to see more characters like themselves, or just want the option to decide, which is why it surprises me that a newer RPG has put such a limit on something that is almost an expected feature in games of this type.  I have the same gripe with Black Dessert, a game I currently play, which limits character creation by tying class to gender so that if you want to play a berserker or wizard, it will always be a male, while valkyries and tamers are always female.  Again, limiting player choice when I would have preferred to play a female barbarian berserker when I first started playing the game.

Another group that has spoken out about this, and often one that is ignored when people talk about the developer’s decision, is the trans community.  A group of people who feel that life stuck them in a body that isn’t their own to some degree, and are seeking ways to become what they feel they are meant to be, or feel they should be, and this developer has essentially said if you want to play the game you could be stuck in an uncomfortably similar situation.  I imagine it’s not uncommon for people to play an avatar that looks like the ideal them, what they would want to be rather than what they are in real life, and Rust takes that option away from them.  Gaming is often a way for people to express themselves in an image of what they want to be, not only gender, but often it allows socially awkward people to become outgoing, or people with disabilities to play people with extraordinary abilities.  They can allow someone who is not happy with their appearance to become someone different, or a person who does not feel their birth gender is correct to live a virtual life that feels more comfortable.  All of this choice is non-existent in Rust.

The other part of the argument around this boils down to ‘why now’.  Rust has always randomized race and appearance, but now that a new gender has been added why are people complaining now?  Well, from what I’m seeing it’s not a new gripe, but now the media has gotten involved.  It’s gotten more attention from people who don’t play the game, who may not have known about the randomization, or were waiting to see if it changed as the game got closer to full release.  The Steam forums, reddit, and discussion boards are full of people discussing this, from complaints to support, and everything in between but I think the impression that this is a new complaint is way off base.  It all boils down to how the media is covering the announcement, and that brings me to the most surprising reactions.

The games media, who is usually on the forefront of supporting more diverse choices in gaming have suddenly developed an attitude that’s been called problematic in the past.  The response to diversity, or requests for more variety in games, is sometimes met with statements like “You should be able to empathize with any character despite their race or gender,” or “If you don’t like it don’t buy it.”  Sometimes these statements fit the context, and other times they are just excuses to avoid the topic.  In either case support of more player choice is never a bad thing in my opinion, but suddenly no choice at all seems to be the best thing to ever happen to gaming.  I’m seeing people use the same ‘problematic’ responses now out of some sort of cheerful vindication, but gleefully giving up their own choice in the matter, which honestly confuses me.

Garry Newman stated the reason for the decision was:

We felt that player customization had got a bit out of control in other games. And we didn’t want to spend six months making a player customization tool – we wanted to concentrate on the game. We also wanted the appearance of the players to be consistent over time. A survivor shouldn’t be able to attack another then come back later with a different gender or race and befriend the same player.

Which sounds a bit too much like the excuses for not having a female character in AC: Unity to me, but no one in the major games media is pointing this out.  Instead it’s being lauded as a statement about gender and race in gaming, which of course brings its own sort of baggage when anyone tries to discuss games.  When is more diverse choice, more player options, and more player control of their own experience ‘out of control’?  In an era of so much opportunity and so much discussion over giving players more representative imagery, why is it suddenly so acceptable to leave out one of the features that gives players the ability to create exactly the representation they want?  Unfortunately because the media has made it about the issue of diversity rather than choice, one can’t be against this decision without being labeled sexist or racist in many circles.  It’s muddied the waters even more for any discussion about diversity and greater player choice in gaming.

The worst of the entire drama though has been the sites using this to, once again, take shots at male gamers and the stereotypes surrounding them.  One headline from the Daily Dot, that has since been changed, states, “For the first time in gaming history, men are forced to play as something they’re not.”

DailyDotHeadline

Not only is this demonstrably false, but how does this in any way further the discussion of inclusion and player choice?  Let’s not forget that Rust isn’t just forcing men to play what they’re not, the game forces women and trans players to sometimes play what they’re not as well.  If the developers had stupidly decided to not include female models at all we’d be reading headlines about how female players are once again forced to play male protagonists, and it would be a valid criticism.  Some women still are in this game, but it seems more important that men are getting hit with it?  This headline sounds more like being happy about getting revenge than furthering any sort of progress in gaming.  It is also written by someone who clearly cares more about making a ‘political’ point rather than stating facts.  After quite a few gamers pointed out all the female protagonists throughout gaming history the headline was changed.

Unfortunately, none of this matters to some folks.  Some will say not liking this idea means I hate women or something, when all I really want is more player choice in as many games as possible with less of this political BS muddying the discussion.  I’m tired of the media using every opportunity to shit on gamers, and I wish every developer focused on giving players as many options as possible.  I want discussion about these issues to be possible without all the name-calling and tribalism.  We’re really all one community and when the media and developers set us on each other for clicks and sales, it’s really us who lose.

Of Game Ratings, Authoritarians, and Letting Parents Parent

TT_NotTheFandom

As if the UK wasn’t imitating an Orwell novel enough, now we have this lovely piece of intrusive control hitting gamers across the pond.  In case you don’t want to deal with the awful design, and ads in the Independent’s piece, basically a bunch of schools sent letters home to parents saying they’d call the police, and child services, if their children were known to play games rated 18+, as a form of neglect.  To make matters worse, these teachers, and school officials, educators whose job is to pass on the facts of the world to young people, base this all on the debunked pseudo-science that video games cause violence.  I’ll give you a moment to let that particularly sour piece of meat settle.

So, boys and girls, if it wasn’t bad enough that our friends in jolly ol’ England could go to jail for expressing wrong-think on Twitter, now they can get the cops called if they decide their kid is mature enough to play Call of Duty.  My first thought was: is it even illegal?  Over here in the states, stores can’t sell or give mature content to kids.  It’s not illegal for a parent to buy a mature game and give it to their kid, though.  Turns out it’s not illegal in England either, so it begs the question, where the hell do these schools get off making threats like this?  Well, they’re calling it neglect, endangering the children…them dangerous words again, for the children, won’t someone think of them?

I’m all for wanting parents to be parents.  I’ve written about it many times before.  I hate to see parents ignore their children and let technology be the parent, or babysitter, but I hate seeing that decision taken away from parents even more.  Parents decide when their child is mature enough for certain books, movies, and games, not the school.  The police should only ever be involved if there’s a crime, which we’ve determined this wouldn’t be.  And child services?  Don’t they have enough to do with children in real abusive and neglectful homes?  Don’t you think they should be focusing on the kids who get locked in closets, beaten, starved and molested rather than Sally who plays COD on the weekends?  Oh, let’s not forget the other part of the schools’ threats, having a social media account could also see a call to the authorities.

What does this mean for us over here?  Well, all too often we have people who think we’d be better off emulating Europe and Britain.  Whose to say a bunch of regressive parents groups and anti-gamer puritans don’t get together and lobby for a similar law?  We don’t exactly have a history of politicians who are kind to gamers, especially when it had to go all the way to the Supreme Court to decide that video games get the same artistic protection as books and movies.  Keep your eyes open friends, things are getting stupid out there.

Indie Developer Support Could Mean Better Games for All

TT_NotTheFandom

At the birth of the video game industry, games were made much the same way indie games are made now. Small groups of artists, writers and programmers came together, often with very little money, and big ideas, and created some of the most memorable experiences early gamers had. Some of these games are still remembered today as classics, and the foundation of what we have now. Over the years larger games, larger budgets, and massive enterprises have come to make up the bulk video game industry, but there is still a healthy indie game market that can’t be ignored. As a matter of fact, I think it needs our support to make sure we get better games in the future. I’m going to give you a breakdown of why I think that’s the case, and a few of my concerns over indie studios.

Inspire Innovation

First and foremost, supporting indie devs can mean more innovation in games.  AAA studios and big publishers continue to push out the same old games, with the same stories and mechanics, with few innovations year to year.  They do that because they have to guarantee a return of the huge budgets they have to get to make the games they make.  It’s why we have the same COD game every year, another Battlefield with all its bugs, Halo, Tomb Raider, Assassin’s Creed and on and on.  Many of these games are fun, people love them, and buy them by the boat-load, but at the end of the day, there’s little difference between each installment of the game.  Companies don’t want to take the risk with so much money involved.

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Parenting in a Gaming and Technological World

TT_NotTheFandom

Before we jump down this rabbit hole I’d like you to say a word in your head.  It’s a simple word, but not always an easy one, especially when it comes to our kids.  Just say it with me, “No.”

When I grew up, my parents weren’t gamers, though they did play some video games with us kids.  They found a few games they liked, but overall it wasn’t their primary hobby.  I’ve been a parent for almost eighteen years now, and have been a gamer much longer.  My son’s been a gamer since he was old enough to hold a controller.  Despite the difference between my hobbies, and my parents’, there’s one commonality, we parent.  There are different challenges I’m sure, but I’ve always been a gamer so I can only imagine what it was like for my folks, before the internet, before PC gaming, and before cable was really a household staple.  Now we have a plethora of digital media that kids can access literally at their fingertips, but despite it all we still parent.  Say it with me, “No.”

I’m reminded of a conversation I had on Twitter, with an anti-porn advocate that thinks porn should be banned…on the internet…good luck, buddy.  Anyway, this guy was going on about how kids can access porn all the time; smart phones, tablets, laptops, just porn all the time.  But I mentioned that parents have a responsibility to make sure their children understand what’s acceptable, to explain sex and porn, and to monitor their habits.  To this guy, that wasn’t enough, but why not?  Are parents powerless to monitor their child’s online habits?  Of course now you’re saying, “Hey, the title says Gaming!”.  Yes, I’m getting there, but honestly to me the challenges here are the same, as are the responsibilities.  You know the word you should be saying, say it again, “No.”

Children cannot get a cell phone, computer, laptop, tablet, or gaming console without a parent to give them money, sign contracts, and give permission.  Of course once they have these, getting access to websites, games, chat rooms, and social media is easier, but we parents still have tools like parental controls, and our own eyes.  We have to take a bit of responsibility upon ourselves to look at ratings, chat logs, browser history, and take the time to be involved.  Talk to our kids about what’s going on, see what they’re doing from time to time, and even when they get upset that we’re ‘invading their privacy’ we have to remind them that as parents, that’s our job.  It sucks sometimes, but it’s what we do.  Say it again, Sam. “No.”

As an example, my son didn’t get a cell phone until just recently and he’ll be eighteen this year.  I didn’t need one as a kid, he didn’t need one either.  As soon as he got old enough to be going places on his own, and soon start looking for work, then we got him one.  The same sort of responsibility goes into monitoring gaming habits.  He doesn’t buy a game without asking, and he didn’t get Grand Theft Auto, no matter how many times he asked, until I thought he was old enough to play it.  I said, “No.”

That’s the hardest part for gamers, I think.  We love games, and we love when our kids love games.  Sometimes we have to be conscious of when games are acceptable for us, but not for our kids.  We look at other gamers and rarely consider things like age, we are all just gamers, but when they’re our kids we have to consider that.  I didn’t have that trouble with GTA – I don’t own it, never will, it’s just not my thing – but I can understand wanting to share a game we love with our kids.  We want to play online with them, and share our interests, so it’s easy to overlook things like ratings.  We have to be able to say it, “No.”

A lot of parents lament at the options available to kids, but we have to be the gatekeepers for all of that content.  I imagine it’s more difficult than it was for our parents, but we don’t really know any different, we weren’t parents then.  It’s the world we live in, and we have to try to balance our own love for gaming, and the culture around it, with raising our kids in that world.  Help them understand the difference between the online world and the real one.  Teach them how to interact with people face to face, as well as the value of dealing with people online like they’re other people.  Explain how there are ugly places in the world, dark ideas, uncomfortable themes in games, all that exist for a reason and why they are ugly, dark, and uncomfortable.  Most of all we need to say…you guessed it, “No.”

It doesn’t have to be all negative though.  There are tons of games out there to play with your kids, and ways to parent through gaming.  Learning games, puzzle games, adventure games that you can co-op with them.  Spend time with them and share your love of the hobby.  Incorporate family time into fun party games, racing games and sports games.  It’s a great way to have time with your family and share something we all love.  This is the greatest part of being a parent in a gaming world, but we always have a responsibility, and we have to be able to say, “No.”

Should Competitive Gaming Be Considered a Sport?

Guest Post by: Kenny Leng

To give you the short and simple answer – Yes! I think competitive gaming should be considered a sport, but I do find eSports a better term for it.

By definition, a sport is “an activity involving physical exertion and skill in which an individual or team competes against another or others for entertainment.”

If you look at some of the bigger competitive games like League of Legends, CS: GO, Dota 2 and Hearthstone, they definitely fit in this category.

This is BLASPHEMY! You SIT ON YOUR BUTT All Day! – That’s Not Sports!

I definitely can see why some people get a huge reaction to this, and rightfully so. Colin Cowherd was one of those that had such a reaction, which was promptly defended by pro basketball player Gordon Hayward. Ex-Laker star Rick Fox has also spoken on this topic as well.

1

For some people, when hearing the word sports, they picture humans with strong athletic bodies and some form of physical contact. But when you put that with video games, it doesn’t seem to match up!

In other words, most do not identify with this and can’t seem to grasp the concept. I think the closest example I can use is Chess. Chess is also a sport that you “sit on your butt all day.”  What most didn’t account for is the mental aspect of the game itself. You have to think a few steps ahead of your opponent and outwit them. People watch chess games and love the strategies and mind games that comes along with it.

In competitive gaming such as CS: GO, fast reflexes and team coordination is very important. Proper execution of strategy is key to winning in these types of environments. Some people also enjoy watching it for the same reasons as chess.

2

The same goes for League of Legends. It is a game where you have to keep track of multiple things at any given time. You need to be aware of what the enemy team is doing and what you should be doing when a team battle happens. There is a lot of mental exertion on the brain to perform well in these situations.

The Stigma Remains

Now video games don’t have the best reputation when it comes to the general public. Most view it as a way to pass time when you are bored.

I recently went back to my home country of Singapore, a country that is very big on the “Education first, everything else is second” mentality. I told some of my high school classmates about eSports and how it has grown into a career for some. They couldn’t believe what I was saying, but they were genuinely interested in what it has become.

To give you an idea, I was talking to about 4 doctors, 6 dentists and 2 businessmen. As you can already tell, they are very accomplished individuals. I just happened to be the odd ball that didn’t do the standard things that my parents wished I did. My parents are okay with me being a video game entrepreneur now, as they know I can pay the bills and support them.

Things Change and We Should Embrace It

Anytime something new or different shows up, we tend to be shocked and become resistant to change. But as time goes by, it becomes the norm.

When I was growing up, my favorite past time was to run around in parks and play with other kids outside. Nowadays, the typical entertainment is a computer and other electronic devices like the iPad. It even changes the way we communicate. Instead of a phone call, most teens are using text and cool apps like LINE and WhatsApp as their main form of communication.

The old me would say that things were so much better back then, but, the truth is, I am just looking back to nostalgia and can’t let go of it.

The world is constantly changing – whether good or bad, it evolves. It is up to the individual to also evolve and adapt to what it has become. The quicker one is able to embrace the changes for what it is, the happier he or she becomes.

That is the approach I have now for competitive gaming and all things in life. I also suggest you try this out. Thank me later!

I Am All for Competitive Gaming Showing Up in Olympic Games Someday

I know this sounds outrageous and something so far out of reach. However, I do believe it will be accepted some day. Right now, competitive gaming is still not widely accepted. It will require time for it to become the norm.

With eSports growing fast, it will get there eventually. What are your thoughts on competitive gaming as a sport? Whether you agree with me or not, I would like to hear your opinions!

Author Bio – Kenny is the owner of Online Fanatic and is fond of writing various gaming topics during his spare time. You are welcome to drop by and say hello or talk about gaming and entertainment.