RSS Feed

Tag Archives: horror video games

Review: Cursed

Dev/Pub: Jetdogs Studioscursed_1
Medium: PC

I received Cursed and had a hell of a time playing it at first. I was trying to record it for Let’s Plays, but my software wanted NOTHING to do with this game. Finally I was able to stream the game.

What is it?
Cursed is a point-and-click horror type game with a female protagonist. Her fiance has been offered quite a sum of money to rebuild something at a far off estate. It’s odd, but you both want to get married and he takes the job. Off he goes, but it’s been sometime since you’ve heard from him. You do the only sensible thing, you go find him.

What did I think?
Well, that is a complicated answer. I liked and hated this game. It is gorgeously done, the graphics are great. I like the story concept and they added in some great touches. There is a lot to like about the game.

However, it felt disconnected. It lacked fluidity. You were given random puzzles with no inclination of what you were supposed to do. The clues were non-existent. It felt like dumb luck that I figured some things out. There were plenty of instances that it took me longer than it should have to get it, my fault. There were also plenty of times that I was using the hint button over and over because I had no idea what I was supposed to do.

At one point, you need to make a freeze potion to freeze the fountain. Unless I’m the only person who’s never seen an alchemy machine, I was lost. The lack of fluidity made me more frustrated than I would have liked for such a relaxing game. I found myself roaming around trying to figure out what I was supposed to do next. I really wanted to love this game, but I walked away from an anti-climactic ending feeling… meh.

It’s only $5 on Steam so give it a try if you want, but it isn’t one I’d recommend.

Watch Crymson’s stream of Cursed here:
https://www.twitch.tv/realwomenofgaming/v/111729543

Review: The Ritual on Weylyn Island

Dev. by: zemaGamez
Platform: PC
Release Date: Dec. 4, 2015

header (1)

This horror game came out just last month and I couldn’t wait to get my hands on it. The Ritual on Weylyn Island combines the idea of Slender: The Eight Pages with black magic rituals, creating a scary story of epic proportions.

What’s it about?
The Ritual on Weylyn Island follows Moira, a 22-year-old woman who travels to Blessed Island to help her remaining family members settle the death of their patriarch, her grandfather. When she arrives, however, the house is in ruins, with strange symbols on the walls in blood, and her family is nowhere to be found. Your goal is to find your twin sister, Rowena, and get off the island.

What did I think?
This game is absolutely terrifying. I would say it’s even worse than Slender: The Arrival and you all know how that game affected me. The mixture of a dread-inducing score, gut-wrenching graphics and horrifying whispers leaves you on the edge of your seat.

Instead of finding notes, you find tapes for a walkman you pick up in the beginning of the game. This is a nice change from finding notes in other horror games because you don’t have to read anything. You can continue to explore the area or meet your objective while the information you need is being told to you.

The story itself is interesting, too. It’s Moira’s goal to become close with her sister once more, but when Rowena is nowhere to be found, Moira has to brave the unknown to rescue her. Along the way, we get little snippets of what’s happening on the island with some jump scares peppered in.

Do I recommend it?
Oh, yes. If you liked being scared out of your wits, this is the game for you. The graphics are good, the story is interesting and the concept is very well done. You can find The Ritual on Weylyn Island on Steam.

Review: Layers of Fear (Part 2 – ENDING)

Review: Layers of Fear (Part 2 – ENDING)

Yesterday, I finally finished Layers of Fear. After just over 2.5 hours of playing, I was not disappointed!

**This Review Contains Spoilers!**

What’s the second half about?
In the second half, you’re trying to find the remaining items you need to finish your painting. Since the game is not finished, there are only 4 items to find. In the first half, I found skin for the canvas and a vial of blood for the paint. In this half, I found a bone, which was to be ground up into dust for painting and priming, and a lock of hair for the brush. This half of the game featured dolls pretty heavily, since the final items both had to do with the main character’s daughter.

What did I think?
This game is absolutely stunning. The graphics are amazing, but I was most impressed by the constant changing of the house. In the first half, we saw that going through the same door may not lead to the same results. In this half, they stepped it up a notch. They were changing my surroundings while I was turning around, sometimes to the point where looking out the window allowed the whole room to be changed around me.

The jump scares in the second half are even scarier than the ones in the first half. You’re turning around to find dolls, ghosts and all sorts of scary things behind you, above you or beside you. You’re opening doors to find massive doll heads blocking your way. It’s absolutely terrifying.

The ending was nothing to get excited about, since the game isn’t finished. You’re basically walking down a hallway and the game cuts to black and lets you know that that’s all there is right now. I can’t wait for more updates. I can’t wait for the game to be finished.

Would I still recommend it?
Oh, hell yes. Buy this game. Play this game. Scream at this game. Just play it. It’s absolutely amazing. I’m not ready for it to be over and I can’t wait for more content.

Watch me play it here, here, here and here!

-Vanri the Rogue

Review: Amnesia: The Dark Descent

Review: Amnesia: The Dark Descent

Amnesia: The Dark Descent is a survival horror game from Frictional Games. I decided to play it for our Wanna Don’t Wanna broadcast because it was only a few dollars on steam. I hadn’t heard much about the game, so I didn’t know what to expect.

What’s it about?
You play as Daniel, a young man who’s lost his memories. You have to explore a stone castle for clues about a man named Alexander. You find letters written by your pre-amnesiac self, instructing you to kill Alexander. You also have to collect tinderboxes, oil for your lantern, and chemicals that you can mix into a corrosive acid. All the while, you’re running away from Alexander’s “shadow,” which is basically his astral projection.

What did I think?
This game is super boring. It’s quiet, with only the occasional creepy noise. You find yourself going in circles, without anything new to guide you. It’s more about exploring than actually escaping anything scary, which is a little too low-key for a horror game.

The graphics reminded me of Quake (1996), which shouldn’t be the case for a game released in 2010. The lower quality took away from the experience. I didn’t find myself scared or on edge at all.

Also, the camera movements were such that I felt motion sick while playing. This has a tendency of happening with First Person Shooter games, but rarely happens in first person horror games.

Would I recommend it?
No. Don’t play this game. It’s a waste of time. Spend your money and time on something better.

Watch me play it here:

-Vanri the Rogue

Knock-knock Review

Knock-knock Review

Released: October 4, 2013
Published by: Ice-pick Lodge
Platform: PC, PS4

Knock-knock is a horror game centered around an insomniac who is forced to wander around his house while trying to reassure himself that nothing sinister is happening. The game was successfully funded on Kickstarter in September 2012, which allowed for its release the following year. More recently, in September of this year, the game became available on the PS4, which marks Ice-pick Lodge’s first game on a console.

What’s it about?
Knock-knock is about a cabin deep in the woods that has been home to 3 generations of lodgers. The present lodger begins to notice strange things about his once-familiar surroundings. Creepy noises are heard, things are missing and, at night, it seems that someone else has made the cabin their home, too.

The objective of the game is to stay awake and sane until dawn. You must wander the rooms and repair light bulbs, start clocks and avoid the gruesome guests that your Lodger does not want to see. You must solve the puzzle and find the answers to why everything has become so strange.

What’s the idea?
According to Ice-pick Lodge’s website, the idea came about from an anonymous email. This email challenged the team to make an unconventional game based on enclosed materials. The attached folder, titled “lestplay,” included text, audio files and video footage. The email specified that all of the files had to be used in the game, but gave them no other restrictions.

What did I think?
I had no idea what I was doing in this game. Granted, I did not know it was a puzzle game before I started playing because I was keeping myself in the dark intentionally. That being said, I’m not good at puzzle games. I couldn’t figure out what I was supposed to do. I even looked up walkthroughs that were telling me things I already knew, but not telling me how to apply that knowledge to the game. The biggest tip was that I was supposed to listen for audio clues, but I couldn’t figure out what those clues were.

Despite my personal experience and my lack of talent with puzzle games, Knock-knock is a very clever game. It’s visually stunning and absolutely terrifying. It’s an unconventional idea that turned into something amazingly beautiful. I can say that, if I had been able to get passed the 4th level, I wouldn’t have been able to put this game down (of course, I couldn’t get passed level 4 and I ended up rage quitting).

Do I recommend it?
Oh, yes. If you can solve puzzles with patience and ease, this is the game for you. Even if you can’t, you should really look into it, if only to see the design and the concept.

You can find Knock-knock on Steam, the Apple Store, Google Play, the Windows Store and PS4.

Watch me play it here:

Maybe I’ll watch some gameplay online and try it again. Do you think I should? Let me know in the comments!

-Vanri the Rogue