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Bitcoin Mining: How it Affects PC Gamers


If you’re like me, you hear the word “Bitcoin” and automatically think “huh?” As far as I was concerned, bitcoin was an online cryptocurrency that had nothing to do with anything I was interested in. A friend of mine told me a few years ago to invest in it, but that’s not really my strong suit, so I ignored him and kept on gaming.

Well, I should have paid more attention. Bitcoin has blown up. Bitcoin is apparently worth thousands. It’s currently an unregulated currency that allows people to make online purchases anonymously. It’s not tied to any banks or any government; it’s completely online.

There are various ways to get bitcoin. First, you can use an exchange app, such as Coinbase. Second, a friend or possibly an employer or buyer can transfer bitcoin to you online, much like sending cash digitally (think Paypal or Venmo). Finally, and most importantly to the topic of this article, you can mine it.

According to CNNTech, people use computers to solve complex math problems in a competition. A winner is chosen every 10 minutes and awarded with 12.5 bitcoins. This is how new bitcoin is created.

Bitcoin miners are buying high end GPUs in bulk in order to solve these math problems faster, thus creating a significant shortage in the supply. This shortage is driving up the prices at a nearly 80% markup.


Because of this drastic increase in price and shortage of supply, PC gamers are finding it almost impossible to build their own rigs. Nvidia has strongly suggested that retailers prioritize gamers over miners, but retailers are going to sell to whomever is going to pay. Some retailers have tried to place a limit on how many any one person can buy at one time, while others, like Micro Center in Pennsylvania, are offering huge discounts to gamers who buy their GPUs with other computer parts.

This problem doesn’t look like it’s going away anytime soon, which will drastically impact PC gamers in the long run. Why spend upwards of $800 for a $300 GPU when you can just buy a PS4 or Xbox One X for $500? How long until the price of pre-built computers goes up, too?

Until suppliers can meet the demand and flood the market with graphics cards, gamers are going to see the shit end of the stick.

Tell us your thoughts in the comments below!

PC Gaming Peripherals to Optimize your Experience

When we talk about optimising your PC gaming experience, the first thing people talk about is usually upgrading your graphics card or processor. However, there is much more to your gaming experience than just graphics quality and frame rate.

Quality Headphones
Sound is a huge part of modern gaming. If you’re playing your PC’s sound from a pair of tiny speakers, you’re missing out on a huge part of the gaming experience.

Whether you’re listening for footsteps nearby in a first-person shooter or you’re watching and listening to a cinematic in your favorite Role-Playing Game, the quality of your games’ sound can change your experience.

A good set of gaming headphones can improve your gaming experience by allowing you to feel a part of the gaming experience, and let you feel all the small nuances of sound that the developers put into the game.


Gaming Chair
When you play PC games, you’re generally sitting in one place for hours at a time. It’s difficult to feel a part of your gaming experience when you can’t get comfortable in your chair.

A quality, ergonomic gaming chair lets you sit and play for hours on end without getting
uncomfortable or developing aches and pains. Each person has different needs for a gaming chair, and it’s important to find the right chair for you.

Whether you need a strong lumbar pad, a comfortable headrest, and armrests, or additional side supports, the right chair will let you play comfortably for hours.

Gaming Keyboard and Mouse
If you’re looking for a keyboard and mouse for gaming, you could always just buy a $20 office keyboard and mouse combination and call it a day. However, just as your favorite music sounds better through a quality speaker, your gaming experience will benefit dramatically from a high-quality gaming keyboard and mouse.

Before you pick a keyboard and mouse, you need to think about what your needs are. Some people need all the extra buttons to assign to different actions on their game, while others are comfortable with a plain QWERTY style keyboard and a three button mouse with a scroll wheel.

Think about your gaming experience and your needs, then be sure to try different styles. You will be able to find a keyboard and mouse that addresses your needs and feels comfortable.


Pick the Right Monitor
Your monitor displays the visual aspect of your games. Since graphics and frame rate has a large effect on your ability to feel a part of the game, you want to pick a monitor that displays your games in the best way possible.

Full High-Definition, or 1,920 by 1,080 pixels, is the minimum requirement for most modern games. However, a larger monitor combined with newer games can allow you to reach resolutions as large as 2,560 by 1,440. Remember, the higher the pixel count, the clearer your picture. So if your gaming area has enough space, a larger monitor is usually better. Running games at full 4k is a stretch for most hardware at the moment, but investing in a 4k monitor could be a good future-proofing move.

Response and refresh rate are important too. The refresh rate is how often the screen refreshes the display and response time is how quickly a pixel can change from white to black and back again. Faster response time and refresh rate lead to better image quality and smoother animations. Since LCD monitors don’t suffer from screen flicker, usually the refresh rate is more important.Your gaming experience should be comfortable, easy to use, and help to make you feel a part of the


Your gaming experience should be comfortable, easy to use, and help to make you feel a part of the gaming experience. Making these simple upgrades in your PC peripherals will give you an entirely new gaming experience.

Written By: Craig Johnson

OPSEAT is a leading brand of PC gaming chairs.

Review: Cursed

Dev/Pub: Jetdogs Studioscursed_1
Medium: PC

I received Cursed and had a hell of a time playing it at first. I was trying to record it for Let’s Plays, but my software wanted NOTHING to do with this game. Finally I was able to stream the game.

What is it?
Cursed is a point-and-click horror type game with a female protagonist. Her fiance has been offered quite a sum of money to rebuild something at a far off estate. It’s odd, but you both want to get married and he takes the job. Off he goes, but it’s been sometime since you’ve heard from him. You do the only sensible thing, you go find him.

What did I think?
Well, that is a complicated answer. I liked and hated this game. It is gorgeously done, the graphics are great. I like the story concept and they added in some great touches. There is a lot to like about the game.

However, it felt disconnected. It lacked fluidity. You were given random puzzles with no inclination of what you were supposed to do. The clues were non-existent. It felt like dumb luck that I figured some things out. There were plenty of instances that it took me longer than it should have to get it, my fault. There were also plenty of times that I was using the hint button over and over because I had no idea what I was supposed to do.

At one point, you need to make a freeze potion to freeze the fountain. Unless I’m the only person who’s never seen an alchemy machine, I was lost. The lack of fluidity made me more frustrated than I would have liked for such a relaxing game. I found myself roaming around trying to figure out what I was supposed to do next. I really wanted to love this game, but I walked away from an anti-climactic ending feeling… meh.

It’s only $5 on Steam so give it a try if you want, but it isn’t one I’d recommend.

Watch Crymson’s stream of Cursed here:

Review: Slayaway Camp

Dev/Pub: Blue Wizard Digital
Medium: PC


My inner horror nerd was squealing with gore-filled joy when I received this game. Of course, I fired up everything and started playing the game. The interior of a 1980s/90s video store popped up in my view. My first thought was, No Shit, well done! I haven’t seen a video store in nearly 10 years and it brought back that nostalgia of going to Blockbuster on Fridays with my parents to rent some VHS tapes for the weekend. Everything from the shelves, the tube tv in the corner playing previews to the cheesy overhead music was amazing. I’m pumped and I haven’t even started playing.

So what is it?
It is a 1980s horror puzzle where you control the killer. Your first killer is Skullface and you have to move around the board and slaughter teens at the summer camp you may have died at. Sliding around leaving bodies in your wake before disappearing into a demonic portal.

What did I think?

The pixel graphics are only making this game more awesome for me. Not only that, it’s hard and easy at the same time. The game itself is easy to understand. Even when they add more elements in, those elements are easy to understand, yet hard to master. Not to mention, there are different types of deaths to be had! Sometimes, when you slide over to that annoying teenager about to have premarital sex, there pops up a cut scene and you are shown a comical and brutal scene THAT YOU PICKED.

You earn coins throughout the game so that you can buy other murderers and ways to die. I haven’t unlocked a lot, but I love the ones I have and am excited to see more. However, sometimes you just slide over and put a butcher knife in their forehead. Clean and classic. I appreciate the simple murders as much as the cut scenes.

It gets super creative. From using bookcases to murder unsuspecting teenagers or just to block the way so you can redirect your murder to his exit hell portal.

I’ve only played through 3 movies and have unlocked very little but I’m not stopping anytime soon. This is provides me with endless entertainment and it’s less than $10 on Steam. I can’t say enough good about this game. Actually, stop reading this and go buy the game and murder some teenagers yourself.

Review: Grim Dawn

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Review: Grim Dawn (7/10)

I don’t know what it is about steampunk and muzzle loader guns that attract me so, but I do love them in an RPG. Grim Dawn (available on Steam) is just such a game.

In Grim Dawn you play one of the Taken, a victim of demonic possession in a world gone to hell. Freed from your servitude at the end of a hangman’s noose, you are left with a connection to those demonic energies. This connection allows you to use Rift Gates as shortcuts to jump to and from the hubs you’ll encounter along the way of the linear story progression.

You’ll also be able to wield magical energies, as well as martial, as you level. The combination of two classes (chosen from a variety pack of 6) each with its own multipath of trees to specialize in. The customizations available are vast, and that’s got to be one the things that draws me to this game time and time again.

To date, according to Steam, I’ve logged 97 hours in the game. I still haven’t gotten out of the second chapter, or progressed beyond the mid 20s in level. That’s my fault though, too many creation choices.

The graphics are gory, the sound squishy, and the color scheme of the first areas a tad depressing. It is an apocalyptic setting however, so I urge you to look past that. With only a single body type of each gender to start with, your gear is the sole way to make you YOU. Find a weapon that suits you in all the myriad of colored-fantasy-rpg-rarities, summon your pets, carry a few potions, and by all means loot the bodies. Iron bits don’t grow on trees.

The Aetherials won’t kill themselves. Go face the Grim Dawn.

Review: Flat Kingdom

Developer: Fat Panda Games
Publisher: Games Starter
Release Date: April 7, 2016
Platform(s): PC


Flat Kingdom is an adventure platform game for the PC that is more adorable than I have words for. It’s also incredibly frustrating, just like almost all platformers.

You are Flat, knight of the Kingdom. The Princess has been captured because of course she has. By a fox-headed person, whom I assume is wearing a mask. They are also taking all of the crystals that are keeping the Kingdom wonderful and peaceful. Your job, as Flat, is to stop the Fox, save the Princess and return the Crystals. Easy, right?

The artwork is elegant. It honestly looks like it was all cut out of paper and beautifully crafted together. All of the enemies are adorable, but the boss monsters terrifying. I adore everything about this game: the music, sound effects, story, level designs. It is all incredibly thought out and masterfully put together to create an amazing experience for the player.

As Flat, you are primarily a circle, but can also turn into a square and triangle. Each shape has their own pros and cons for each situation, including how to defeat enemies. Thankfully, the game allows you to have a Shape Legend in the bottom right corner to remind you what shape beats what. Circle beats Square; Square beats Triangle; Triangle beats Circle. This is a constant throughout the game; however, it is difficult to tell what all the monster shapes are and this doesn’t necessarily apply to the boss fights. Which are hell all on their own.

The levels, of course, increase in difficulty, starting off with the false hope that I could actually get through a platformer once in my life. Each level reminded me that I’m horrible at these games and that this is my own personal hell. Whilst still having fun and loving the game, I am cursing at the screen each time I die because I was just never good at these to begin with. I will finish this game, though, if it’s the last thing I do.

Right now, I’m in the third section of the game, trying valiantly to finish it and not throw my computer out the window at the same time. My Let’s Plays have dwindled down into death montages and glares at the webcam, but I swear I love this game and, for $8, you will love this game, too. I can’t wait to see what the store has laid out for me because I feel there is so much more than meets the eye.

Watch my first let’s play here:

5 Classic PC Games that are Still Worth a Play

5 Classic PC Games that are Still Worth a Play

Guest Post by: Caroline from Culture Coverage

I would like to thank Real Women of Gaming for publishing this article. They cover everything related to gaming, including conventions and reviews. Check out their Indie Spotlight section if you’re looking for some great new titles to pick up. 

guest post pic 1

There’s never been a better time to get into PC gaming. Not only does PC get a majority of the best titles, it also boasts one of the largest catalogs available to users. With hundreds of new games released daily on sites like GOG and Steam, it can be difficult to choose which ones to buy. If you’re not quite sold on the latest releases, why not revisit some of these classic PC games?




Although not the first real time strategy (RTS) game, it remains one of the most popular PC games even today and has sold over 9 million copies worldwide. It gained a huge following in South Korea, leading to the rise of eSports and the pro-gaming scene. The reason StarCraft stands out against other RTS games of the time is its focus on offering three distinct play styles with the different factions: Zerg, Protoss and Humans. Each faction had different strengths and weaknesses, yet somehow the gameplay managed to be balanced and challenging.

Besides the competitive multiplayer mode, you can also create your own challenge maps or download them if you feel like the game isn’t replayable enough. Before you consider downloading maps off other sites, however, you should first connect to a VPN such as IPVanish as it will encrypt your data and protect you from spam sites. Unfortunately, that has been a problem for some users.

SimCity 2000


There’s something to be said about SimCity 2000. While not the first of the series, it took the original concept and expanded upon it with new features such as different elevations, underground layers for pipes and subways, and a diametric view. All of these changes improved the overall gameplay experience, making it one of the best simulation games on the market even when compared against more recenttitles. Maxis brought in deeper gameplay and strategy with their improved budget and finance controls. They also included the ability to connect to other cities.

If you get tired of just building up your city, you can also jump into scenarios to rebuild a city after some disaster. Most of these scenarios are based off of real events such as the Oakland firestorm of 1991. The main building mode doesn’t necessarily have an ending, but you can move on to work on a new city. Alternatively, you can unleash your wrath and destroy it with monsters, floods and fires. SimCity 2000 is still incredibly fun to play and even the graphics are acceptable by today’s standards. While not the most realistic game, the pixel art is incredibly detailed and still some of the best in the style.

World of Warcraft


Say what you will about the game, World of Warcraft remains the most subscribed massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG) around. Building off of the lore in Warcraft: Orcs & Humans (and other games in the series), World of Warcraft continues the story between the Alliance and the Horde. One of the reasons the game remains so popular today is because of its rich story, great balance and ability to play casually or more seriously. As with other MMORPGs, players can customize not only the appearance of their character, but their class and skills as well.

Regardless of what you choose, you can always find other people who have the same interests in terms of gameplay. Many people have started friendships with other players and some have even forged romances in real life. World of Warcraft continues to update their game with expansions and patches to increase and expand content, update graphics, and balance the various classes. While its subscribers might have dropped since its maximum of 12 million players, there are still millions of people playing the game.



With the remastered version of Doom now available, you might want to check out the original game that started it all. The graphics definitely don’t hold up to the test of time, but the gameplay is just as frantic and fast. Generally considered the game that pioneered the first-person shooter, Doom introduced a pseudo-3D first-person perspective. This affected both level design and the overall gameplay experience as well. Players can gauge how far away enemies, obstacles and alternative paths are from their position.

Besides the “3D” aspect, Doom also introduced the ability to equip various weapons from a shotgun to rocket launcher, another feature that has become typical for other games within this genre.



Half-Life 2 might be the more acclaimed game in the series, but if you want to understand Dr. Gordon Freeman’s back story, you’ll want to check out the first in the series. Debuting in 1998, Half-Life took the framework of first-person shooters from Doom and improved upon it with actual 3D graphics and more realistic gameplay.

Although technically a first-person shooter, Half-Life also integrated puzzles for players in order to progress through levels. This differentiated it enough from many other shooters whose sole focus was on defeating enemies. In another departure, the game did not use cut scenes to tell the story. Instead, it used scripted sequences seen through Gordon’s eyes. Many other developers have used a similar mechanic to make the story more immersive and seamless.

There are hundreds of other classic games that still stand the test of time in terms of gameplay. Which ones did we miss? Tell us in the comments below.

About the Author: Caroline is a freelance writer who enjoys all things related to tech and gaming. She’s excited to see how games will change with the advent of new technology like virtual reality, but also doesn’t want to forget the classics.