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Town of Salem

Town of Salem2683996-shirtdesignnotexture
Blank Media Games
PC/Mac

I’ve had Town of Salem for awhile now. I bought it based on a suggestion from Noah of +2 Comedy, as we were talking about my love of Werewolf the board game. Both are similar to Mafia. If you don’t understand anything I just said, that’s fine. I’ll explain.


Town of Salem is a 15 player game. You and 14 other people form a town and you each have a role to play. Depending on what version of the game you play, you could be anything, but let’s talk about classic mode. 


In classic mode, you have the following good guys:
Sheriff (interrogating others to find out what they are)
Doctor (healing people)
Investigator (investigate for clues on a person’s role)
Jailor (interrogate and possibly kill a person)
Medium (can speak with the dead)
Escort (can block a person from doing their job)
Lookout (stalks people to figure out what they are)
Veteran/Vigilante (can kill people, hopefully for good)
Random Townie (can be anything)

Your bad guys are: 
Godfather (in charge of the mafia, orders the killing)
Framer (can plant evidence on other townies)
Executioner (whole job is to get one particular person lynched)
Mafioso (does the killing for the Godfather)
Serial Killer (kinda self explanatory)
Jester (tries very hard to get him/herself lynched)

I know that is a lot to take in, but that isn’t even half the roles in the game.

So, you 15 are in this town and have one of the above roles. You either have to kill all the good guys or kill all the bad guys, depending on which side of justice you’re on. During the day, you have to convince the other townspeople of your innocence and another’s guilt or lie through your teeth to get someone else killed. During the day the town votes on a person to lynch and at night murder and mayhem happen.

 

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In the game, you are given tools. You have a Will that you can use to keep track of what you’re doing. If you are a jailor or an investigator, you can use this tool to record what it is you see or hear. By doing this not only do you keep a track of what’s happening but also, if you die, this is made public to everyone. Your second tool, if you’re a bad guy, is a death note. This can be useful, even if you’re evil. If you are the mafia and find someone is immune to killing attacks at night, they are most likely the Serial Killer. You can put that in your note, hoping that the town pays attention when you kill your next innocent and hangs your rival.


Besides classic mode, there are several other play modes. My current favorite is Chaos Any mode. You have no idea what the roles are and anyone could be anything.

I think the graphics are adorable. You have little avatars and houses that you come out of each morning. With coins, or cash, you can change your avatar, house, pet, method of death (I get struck by lightning) and even the playing arena.

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I love playing this game. I bought it on Steam for $5 and it was some of the best money I ever spent. Despite my love for this game, however, I can’t stand most of the people who play. Unless I am playing with a group of friends, I get annoyed very quickly. It boils down to the maturity of the people playing, really, and most of the time it’s low. A great deal of the time, people will leave if they don’t like their role or if they die they will abandon the game, which pisses off the medium.


Fortunately, they seemed to put a cap on my biggest issue: the entire game would be filled with racist and sexist jokes. Thankfully, they put a filter on so it says something cute, like “tarnation,” when people are being douches. I’ve seen people get around it by adding spaces, but it is a step in the right direction. Of course, we are still left with people being idiots in game, so it makes it increasingly difficult to make proper deductions. This feels like one of the unfortunate things you will just have to deal with because, as we all know, playing online subjects you to all sorts of people.

If you don’t have this game, you should. You can play it for free at BlankMediaGames.com or you can purchase it on Steam. Feel free to add me to your friends list!

Giving Thanks to Games

Posted on

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Since this is the time of the year for reflection and thankfulness, I thought I’d ask my fellow admins what games they were thankful for. This is what we had to say:

 

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My sister has always been my best friend but, as we get older and life becomes increasingly more hectic and stressful, our time together is precious. For the last couple months, we have started playing Hearthstone together. It’s almost a tradition now, where we play the latest Tavern Brawl and chat with each other. I spam the emotes and she gets annoyed. It’s a good time, really! It can be so easy to be consumed with all of the stuff around us that we get disconnected with some of the people that make life great. So thank you, Hearthstone, for being a wonderful part of our friendship and helping us connect around brutally hitting each other’s faces with beasts and mechs and stuff.

~ Avenue

Dungeons & Dragons has been ever-present in my life. Even though I didn’t start playing until I was in my early 20s, I’ve found that D&D has always had a special place in my heart. My brother and his friends played it weekly and two of my older sisters would join in every once in awhile. My brother was always talking to me about it and telling me all about the monsters and the races, etc. By the time I was old enough to play, my oldest siblings were already out of the house, so I had nobody to play with. Fast forward to 2013, when Crymson invited me to play in my first campaign. I’ve been playing ever since. Not only has it brought me closer to many of my good friends, but it’s also allowed me to connect with my siblings in a way I couldn’t before. So, thank you Dungeons & Dragons. I hope you continue to bring people together.

~ Vanri the Rogue

I have had one game that has been a constant in my life. My whole family plays it. We trash talk and make bets. It is mini golf. I know, I know. This doesn’t sound like the type of game that we would normally be blogging about, but it is a game that I love to play. My mom, dad, younger brother and I played a lot of mini golf. It was affordable and fun. My dad used to patiently try to teach me how to line up a shot while reminding me to just stay calm. It was good practice for life and playing other games, since I get so frustrated with myself.

My older cousins and their kids play with us now and there is a lot of competition. We go in a big group and split up in different teams. We play, we tease each other and then we eat ice cream. It is always fun. We tell stories about playing on the same courses when we were kids. Most importantly, we all get to be together.

~ Thia the Bard

The first video game that I ever got for myself was Pokemon: Yellow for the GameB
oy back in the year 2000. I had been collecting the cards, so getting the game just seemed like a natural outgrowth of that CCG obsession (I managed to snag 5 Charizard cards over my collecting career, by the way, all booster pack pulls. I still have three of them). Ever since then, the Pokemon series has held an important place in my gamer heart. I got at least one game from each generation. While I may not have caught ’em all since the early days of the games (I mean, really, who has time to catch over 700 ‘mons these days?), there is something exhilarating about that ‘click!’ when a pokeball successfully loc photo gt2gRINSHI_zpsq9jrztt7.pngks tight around a rare pokemon, even after all these years. It makes me so happy when I can help my friends by breeding pokemon that I have and they need. Most importantly, though, Pokemon led me to be a gamer, and, without that, I may never have made the wonderful relationships that I have, including my husband, my best friend, and many of my closest friends. So thank you, Pokemon, for turning me into a Real Woman of Gaming, and for making my life complete.

~ Rinshi

I have to say the game I am most thankful for is EverQuest. It was my first MMO. The people I met through that game and the experiences I had there helped build my beliefs on how women can be just as included in games as men.

I had a good guild and was never harassed. I made great friends and, even though we all went separate ways, I still remember the experience as a great one and always strive to find it again in anything I play.

~ KinkedNitemare

I can’t say that I am thankful for any one game, really. Everquest was my first MMO, and it did make an impact on my life. I was first introduced to it when I stopped by a buddy’s room in the barracks while I was stationed in Alaska. I was amazed at the game. I would just hang out and watch him play for hours a night. Eventually, he let me make a character and try it out for myself. I was hooked at that point. I got my own account and would play for hours after work and all weekend long, many times pulling 24+ hour marathons. For $15 a month, I was transported into a new world, making friends from all over the planet. I played steadily until 2005 when a bunch of us in Afghanistan got into playing WoW, which ended up taking the place of Everquest for a few years (though I would still jump into it every so often). Eventually, I got burned out on the daily grind of WoW and moved back to EQ. MMO’s were my escape from the daily grind of work and deployment.

~ Fluffy the Necromancer
When I was a kid, my grandmother worked at Kiddy City and the Nintendo was the newest thing, so she bought it for us that Christmas. At first, I really wasn’t sure what to make of it, but I got my

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Credit: Victoria Mallon

hands on Super Mario Bros and was hooked. Mario was not my first love, though, Final Fantasy was. My father had picked it up and helped me play. It got to the point where we would talk about things that happened in the game. It was exciting and new and a great bond I had with my father. That is what got me into gaming but, all these years after his passing, I have those memories to look back on and remember him and all the fun we had together so fondly. I often wonder what he would think of the games out today. I hope that one day I can share a bond like that with my daughter.

~Crymson Pleasure~

What games are you thankful for? We’d love to hear your stories. Thank you for reading and have a great holiday!

Elder Sign: Omens

Elder Sign: Omens Review
Fantasy Flight Games
Mobile Game

I picked up this one because I own Elder Sign, the board game, and I love it. I dipped my toe in the gaming world of H. P. Lovecraft with Elder Sign and I ran off madly into the night with Cthulhu soon after.


Elder Sign: Omens plays almost just like the board game, which to me is a huge bonus. I walked into this with a general idea of what I am doing. It has a similar array of characters to choose from. I say similar because I do not own all of the expansions for the board game, but have purchased most of the expansions for the mobile game, which run about $2.99 each.


You choose your Elder One. Some are obviously much harder than others. I’ve beaten all of them except Cthulhu himself, the Elder One of the first expansion you can purchase. After you have made your selection (it does tell you how easy/hard each Elder One is), you select four members of your team. You get to go over each of their abilities and, after a lot of practice, I do have my ‘dream team’ out of the characters that are already unlocked. I do urge you to always take Kate Winthrop with you, since she is immune to terror effects and I find her instrumental in the game.


You go from room to room, defeating evil and gaining items. You gain spells (they hold dice rolls that you may need), common and rare weapons (additional red and/or yellow die to add to your pool), clues (the ability to reroll all remaining dice in your pool), and Elder Signs. You need to collect enough Elder Signs before the Elder One’s Doom Track fills up. Once it fills up, game over. However, if you get the Signs first, you win.


Simple, right?

It’s amazingly well done. It never plays the same twice, even if you pick the same Elder One and the same team. If you love H. P. Lovecraft, or Elder Sign, or board games, then you have to pick this game up. It’s available in your app store.

Women were a rarity, A Guest Post

Magic: The Gathering

Hi there, everyone!  I was asked by my friend Crymson Pleasure to write up a guest post about women in gaming. A little about myself first.  I have been playing tabletop RPG’s since around 1985-86, Magic: The Gathering from 1993, and MMORPG’s since 1999 with Everquest being the one I have played the longest.  

What are my feelings on women in gaming?  There aren’t enough!  Gaming of all types is lacking in female representation, and it shouldn’t be as it’s something that anyone can do no matter their sex, age, color, or any other factor.  There is no reason for women to feel excluded from gaming or made to feel like it’s for boys only.  If more guys would put an effort into welcoming women or getting them to try the games it would expand the amount of available players, and bring more creativity to them.  A great example is my friend Kate.  I met her through my friend Justin, and have introduced them both to Pathfinder and the wonderful world of tabletop RPG’s.  We ended 4 books into a 6-book module set, and they were both enjoying it greatly.  It was first time either one of them have ever played anything like it and she is having as much fun as he and I are.  She asked just as many good questions as he did, and got just as mad as any other player when the dice won’t fall in her favor.    

While I was growing up and playing Magic and early D&D games, women were a rarity, and I think that was at least partially the fault of gamers, and also of the companies making the games.  It wasn’t that we were purposely excluding them, but more that it wasn’t “accepted” as much for them to ask about, and join games.  The advent of online MMORPG’s helped break that mold as – unless you asked – you never knew if the persons you were playing with were guys or girls.  More women started playing games and taking their love of them to the outside world and into tabletop/LARP games.  

Pathfinder Table Top Game

When you look around today you can find women playing and running D&D games, and competing at magic tournaments.  Feline Longmore, and Jadine Klomparens are both women who play Magic at the competitive level and consistently get high placings at the tournaments they go to.  I hope to be that good myself one day.  I am sure there are many more that show up at the individual tournaments and Friday Night Magic in their local area, but there is still not enough.

All in all, we as gamers need to take it upon ourselves to bring more women into the games we play, as they are made to be fun and enjoyed by everyone.  We need to share our love of the games with our friends and loved ones.  Maybe they haven’t joined you in playing because they haven’t felt that rush of a critical hit rolled at just the perfect time, or pulling off the perfect play to a win a game of Magic.  All it takes is that one moment and boom you have them hooked.  

-Henry

Banished Game Review

I recently purchased the game Banished from a Steam Sale and I was super excited because I love building/resource management games, even though they infuriate the hell outta me.

I’ve been playing on the easier levels and, even at easier levels, I had to restart at least 20 times before I had a working town that would survive more than the first few years.

Banished has no real story. As far as I can tell this game is about a group of people who’ve been banished to this land and have to rebuild/start over. You have trees to harvest, iron and stone to mine, herbs to gather for medicine and food to collect.
Read the rest of this entry

+2 Comedy Podcast

plus2logoRinshi and I had the honor of being on the +2 Comedy Podcast *clears throat* severalweeksagoI’msosorry *clears throat* and had an amazing time with Noah and Will. Aside from the fact that we were both extremely nervous and awkward, good times were had by all. But that’s kind of our modus operandi so, really, it was like home. I sucked at the chosen IMDB game (I tried REALLY REALLY HARD), and a fan walked away with a pasta boat, 3 versions of love letter, a deck of steampunk playing cards and a map from the Prototype video game. We had a blast and hope to get invited back right after Will drops those stalking charges (just kidding, charges were never filed). Plus, we are excited that we will be seeing Noah again at You’re Not Alone on July 18th.

In case you haven’t heard it click below:
Rinshi and Crymson Pleasure on +2 Comedy

+2 Comedy Facebook
+2 Comedy Twitter

Catching up with Cosplayer Nation’s Joshua Adams

cosplayernationCrymson Pleasure: Great! Thanks for agreeing to chat with me. I’ve only done a few interviews, so we will get through this together. I’ve been following you and Cosplayer Nation for some time now and I can’t tell you how impressed I am with everything you’ve accomplished. So I’d love to know how Cosplayer Nation got started?

Joshua Adams: Well it all started in late October 2010. I just saw a Uke Li mockumentary called Transcended 4 and asked him if she would come on to my show to be interviewed on cyberstationusa.com. After that, over a bowl of clam chowder at Legal Sea Foods, I asked him if he would be interested in doing a documentary about cosplay. That was in November of 2010. We started filming December 10, 2010 at an ice skating event known as Cosplay Ice Skate in downtown Boston. That’s how it started. Now we’ve been at over 30 cons with plenty of footage of many different cosplayers from Maine to Seattle to Hawaii to Puerto Rico, all across the United States.

Crymson Pleasure: That’s incredible. I adore the documentary. I feel it’s not only an amazing change to take a positive look at cosplayers, but it shows off the true art form that cosplay is and all of the hard work you’ve put into it. What was your inspiration for the documentary?

Joshua Adams: It was because my mother had passed away from pancreatic cancer in April of 2010. She wasn’t a very clear woman and used to take me and my sister on trips to see many different places. My father would go, too, but both the day trips during the summer time we couldn’t go because of work. There’s an outgoing woman, so I wanted to do something for her memory as well as educate cosplayers and non-cosplayers about the history of the culture. It’s still and always will be a fascinating subject and we needed a documentary for it. There are always new of documentaries about the history of comic books and superheroes, but there was never any about cosplay until we started. Afterwards, I found out that there were three other people doing the same thing we were doing. But I wanted to show people all the hard work that we were putting into our documentary. So I let people see the interviews that we did.

Crymson Pleasure: I’m so sorry for your loss. It is truly amazing what our family can inspire us to do. What got you interested in cosplay?

Joshua Adams: All the time and effort that these people were putting into making these costumes. My father is an artist, so I grew up around art sculpture other things like that.

Crymson Pleasure: Have you ever cosplayed?

Joshua Adams: Yes, I’m dressed up as The Dude from The Big Lebowski. I put my own spin on The Dude. I grew my hair long and put on a Hawaiian shirt and flip flops with shorts, so it’s a Hawaiian version of The Dude. I grew up my mustache and had The Dude’s goatee.

Crymson Pleasure: I still have yet to watch that movie. I have to put it on my list. I have several friends very disappointed in me over that.

What do you think is the most pressing need of the cosplay community?

Joshua Adams: Well, that’s a hard question to truly have just one answer to. There are a lot of things that cosplayers and non cosplayer have to agree on. But for me it is trying to understand each other’s outlook on life

Crymson Pleasure: Do you see any trends growing in the cosplay community?

Joshua Adams: That also is a hard question to answer as well. It all depends on what people are watching or playing at the time

Crymson Pleasure: Fair point. I had no idea about Attack on Titan until I walked into Otakon and there were a ton of AoT Cosplayers.

Are there ever things that shouldn’t be cosplayed?

Joshua Adams: Not that I can think of. Just remember some cosplay can offend people. But as long as you enjoy it. I mean, just don’t dress up as a Nazi and walk around the Holocaust Museum. I believe in using common sense.

Crymson Pleasure:That has to be my favorite response ever.

How do you feel about current attitudes in the cosplay community toward gender, body type, or race affecting a person’s costume?

Joshua Adams: I really can’t say. As long as the costume fits you, not the other way around, or it motivates you to improve yourself. But you’ve got to remember this: just be yourself and have fun.

Crymson Pleasure: What are your opinions on Cosplay is Not Consent? Have you ever experienced harassment or bullying while filming or at a convention?

Joshua Adams: Not at all. All the cosplayers and non cosplayers that we have interviewed have always been polite and courteous to us.

Crymson Pleasure: So what is the next step for your documentary? Where will you be showing next?

Joshua Adams: Well, we’re trying to get into more cons to show it and film festivals. We’re going to Long Island Comic Con on June 13th through June 14th. Shown at Boston Comic Con and Shoot City Filmfest, as well as being in the Geeky Awards.

Crymson Pleasure: Will you be showing at Otakon this year?

Joshua Adams: I can’t answer that question right now.

Crymson Pleasure: Well let me know if you do because I’d love the chance to meet you face to face.

Do you have any comments or advice for our fans?

Joshua Adams: Just keep on doing what you love to do and never quit, no matter how hard it is.

Crymson Pleasure: Beautiful advice. Lastly, anything you want to throw out there?

Joshua Adams: Go to our like page on Facebook and like us as well as our Youtube page.

Crymson Pleasure: Awesome, Joshua! Thank you so much for hanging out with me tonight and if there is anything we can ever do to help, just let me know!

Joshua Adams: No problem and we will. You have a good night.